TIPPECANOE SCHOOL CORPORATION HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM GUIDE

Harrison and McCutcheon High Schools are comprehensive secondary schools. The needs of each student are considered when offering an educational program. This guide is to inform students and parents of the requirements and the opportunities available within the curriculum of the Tippecanoe School Corporation. The descriptions are meant to be brief. More complete information and course outlines may be obtained from the schools’ counseling departments.

The Counseling Departments would like to work with students, parents, and faculty in planning each student’s course of study, although the primary responsibility for selecting courses must be taken by the student and his/her parents. Students will be aided through counseling as to what is available, what is required, and the possible outcomes of different choices. However, the actual choices are left to the student. If college bound, the student may wish to consult with his/her college choice for proper high school preparation classes.

Using the Curriculum Guide

Harrison and McCutcheon High Schools are comprehensive secondary schools. The needs of each student are considered when offering an educational program. This guide is to inform students and parents of the requirements and the opportunities available within the curriculum of the Tippecanoe School Corporation. The descriptions are meant to be brief. More complete information and course outlines may be obtained from the schools’ counseling departments.

The Counseling Departments would like to work with students, parents, and faculty in planning each student’s course of study, although the primary responsibility for selecting courses must be taken by the student and his/her parents. Students will be aided through counseling as to what is available, what is required, and the possible outcomes of different choices. However, the actual choices are left to the student. If college bound, the student may wish to consult with his/her college choice for proper high school preparation classes.

The Tippecanoe School Corporation has adopted a schedule to allow secondary students the opportunity to experience a wider variety of courses. It is our intent that students be enrolled in either six or seven classes. Please select no more than one study hall per semester. Students and parents should give serious consideration to the selection of courses. Students will be expected to take those classes in the fall, which they select during registration.

This guide includes all courses approved by the Board of School Trustees of the Tippecanoe School Corporation. These courses are offered on the basis of student interest and staff availability.

Computer technology enables scheduling of each semester independently. This reshuffling of the course offerings each semester makes it possible for more students to fit more electives around the required two semester courses.


College Programs

The Tippecanoe School Corporation offers the Double Up Program with IVY Tech, Early College Program with Vincennes University, and the Purdue College Program with Purdue University. Students should see their counselors for specific eligibility, expectations, and application information.


College Preparatory Curriculum

In 1994, the Indiana State Board of Education, the Commission for Higher Education, and Indiana’s colleges and universities developed Core 40, a college preparatory curriculum. The curriculum is designed to better prepare Indiana high school students for success in college and the workplace. Students who plan to attend colleges or universities should use the Core 40 curriculum as a guide to help them prepare. If the student knows in advance that he/she is interested in a particular college or specific program, the student should check with the college or university to see if there are any special requirements. The Core 40 curriculum became state required for obtaining an Indiana Diploma with the class of 2011.


Commencement Exercise

Only those students who completed all graduate requirements will be permitted to participate in commencement.


High School Graduation Assessments

In accordance with assessment requirements established by the Indiana Department of Education, students must exhibit proficiency in Algebra and English Language Arts.

The graduation qualifying assessment framework for Indiana high school students is currently undergoing modifications. Please contact your school counselor regarding specific assessment requirements relative to your graduating class.


Waiver Process

There are three ways to meet the ECA requirement.

  1. Pass the ECA’s in Algebra I and English 10.
  2. Fulfill the requirements of the Evidence-based waiver:
  • Take the ECA at least one time in sophomore, junior, and senior years.
  • Complete any ECA remediation.
  • Maintain a school attendance rate of 95 percent or better (with excused absences) over the course of high school experience. Have a 2.0 GPA in the state required courses.
  • Satisfy any other state and local graduation requirements.
  • Get a written recommendation from the teacher(s) in the subject area(s) not passed, as well as one from the school principal, and show proof that the academic standards have been met.
  1. Fulfill the requirements of the Work-readiness waiver:
  • Take the ECA at least one time in sophomore, junior, and senior years.
  • Complete any ECA remediation.
  • Maintain a school attendance of 95 percent or better (with excused absences) over the course of high school experience. Have a 2.0 GPA in the state required courses.
  • Satisfy any other state and local graduation requirements.
  • Complete at least one industry certification from the state board’s approved industry certification list. (see counseling office at the high school for more details.)

Opt-Out

Indiana’s Core 40 curriculum provides the academic foundation all students need to succeed in college and the workplace. The Core 40 is Indiana’s diploma requirement.

To graduate with less than Core 40, the following formal opt-out process must be completed:

  • The student, the student’s parent/guardian, and the student’s counselor (or another staff member who assists students in course selection) meet to discuss the student’s progress.
  • The student’s career and course plan is reviewed.
  • The student’s parent/guardian determines whether the student will achieve greater educational benefits by completing the general curriculum or the Core 40 curriculum.
  • If the decision is made to opt-out of Core 40, the student is required to complete the course and credit requirements for a general diploma and the career/academic sequence the student will pursue is determined.

General High School Diploma

English/Language Arts 8 credits
English 9, English 10, English 11, English 12
Mathematics4 credits
2 credits: Algebra
2 credits: Any Math Course
Requirements will include earning 2 Math or Quantitative Reasoning credits during their Junior or Senior year.
Science4 credits
2 credits: Biology I
2 credits: Any Science Course
Social Studies4 credits
2 credits: U.S. History
1 credit: Government
1 credit: Additional Social Studies Elective
College and Career Pathway 6 credits
Flex Credit5 credits:
To earn the five flex credits the student must complete 1 of the following:
More career academic squencing
A co-op or internship
Advanced college credit courses or dual credit
Any combination of additional academic courses
Physical Education2 credits
Health1 credit
PCC1 credit
Speech1 credit
Electives4 credits
40 Total State Credits Required

All students are strongly encouraged to complete a Career Academic Sequences by selecting electives which support their career path.

Indiana Core 40

Course and Credit Requirement

English/Language Arts 8 credits
Including a balance literature, composition and speech.
Mathematics6 credits (in grades 9-12)
2 credits: Algebra
2 credits: Geometry
2 credits: Algebra II
*Students must take a math or quantitative reasoning course each year in high school.
*Students must earn 6 math credits during grades 9-12
Science6 credits
2 credits: Biology I
2 credits: Integrated Chemistry-Physics (ICP) or Chemistry or Physics I
2 credits: any Core 40 Science course
Social Studies6 credits
2 credits: U.S. History
1 credit: U.S. Government
1 credit: Economics
2 credits: World History/Civilization or Geography/History of the World
Directed Electives5 credits
World Languages
Fine Arts
Career/Technical
PCC1 credit
Speech1 credit
Physical Education2 credits
Health and Wellness1 credit
Electives4 credits
(Suggested College and Career Pathway Sequence)


Core 40 with Academic Honors (minimum 47 credits)

For the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma, students must:

  • Complete all requirements for Core 40
  • Earn 2 additional Core 40 math credits
  • Earn 6-8 Core 40 world language credits in one language, or 4 world language credits in each of two languages
  • Earn 2 Core 40 fine arts credits
  • Earn a grade of a “C” or better in courses that will count toward the diploma
  • Have a grade point average of a “B” or better

Complete one of the following:

  1. Earn 4 credits in 2 or more AP courses and take corresponding AP exams
  2. Earn 6 verifiable transcripted college credits in dual credit courses from approved dual credit course list.
  3. Earn both a minimum of 3 verifiable transcripted college credits from the approved dual credit course list and 2 credits in AP
  4. Courses and corresponding AP exams


  1. Earn a combined score of 1750 or higher on the SAT critical reading, mathematics and writing sections and a minimum score of 530 on each
  2. Earn an ACT composite score of 26 or higher and complete written section

Core 40 with Technical Honors (minimum 47 credits)

For the Core 40 with Technical Honors diploma, students must:

  • Complete all requirements for Core 40.
  • Earn 6 credits in the college and career preparation courses in a state-approved College & Career Pathway and one of the following:
  1. State approved, industry recognized certification or credential, or
  2. Pathway dual credits from the approved dual credit list resulting in 6 transcripted college credits
  • Earn a grade of “C” or better in courses that will count toward the diploma.
  • Have a grade point average of a “B” or better.
  • Complete one of the following:
  1. Any one of the options (A-F) of the Core 40 with Academic Honors
  2. Earn the following scores or higher on WorkKeys; Reading for Information- Level 6, Applied Mathematics- Level 6, and Locating Information- Level 5.
  3. Earn the following minimum score(s) on Accuplacer: Writing 80, Reading 90, Math 75.
  4. Earn the following minimum score(s) on Compass; Algebra 66, Writing 70, Reading 80.

TSC Academic Honors Diploma with Distinction

English/Language Arts 8 credits
English 9, English 10, Academic English 11, Academic English 12
Mathematics8 credits
2 credits: Geometry
2 credits: Algebra II
4 credits: Additional credits in Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry, AP Calculus, Finite Mathematics, Probability and Statistics, AP Statistics
Science8 credits
2 credits: Biology I
2 credits: Chemistry I
2 credits: Physics I
2 credits: Additional credits in Advanced Science
Social Studies6 credits
2 credits: U.S. History
1 credit: Government
2 credits: World History or Geography/History of the World
1 credit: Economics
World Languages6 credits in one language
Fine Arts2 credits
Speech1 credit
PCC1 credit
Physical Education2 credits
Health1 credit
Electives11 credits
54 Total State Credits Required

Only courses in which a student has earned a grade of B or above may count toward an Academic Honors Diploma With Distinction. Only courses with grades of either “D” or “F” may be repeated.

*Students must take a Mathematics course or a Quantitative Reasoning course each year they are enrolled in high school.

A student shall maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or above.

A student shall volunteer at least 20 hours of community service during their four years. For details on the community service process, please see the high school website under Guidance and/or Counseling Services.

A student must complete one of the following:

  1. Two advanced placement courses and corresponding AP exams resulting in four high school credits
  2. Academic transferable dual high school/college courses resulting in six college credits
  3. One advanced placement course and corresponding AP exam resulting in two high school credits and academic transferable dual high school/college course(s) resulting in three college credits
  4. Must score 1750 or higher composite on SAT scores with no less than 530 in each section
  5. Must score 26 or higher on ACT composite, including the writing portion.

Advanced Placement Courses

A number of courses designed to prepare students for the rigorous Advanced Placement exams are offered. These exams are administered by the College Board and are designed to give colleges a standardized means for awarding college credit to students who have taken college level classes while still in high school. AP exams are given nationwide during the month of May. Students may score from 1 to 5, with most colleges awarding credit for scores of 4 and 5. The State of Indiana currently pays fees for students taking the AP exams in English Language, English Literature, Calculus, Chemistry, Biology, Physics, and AP Statistics.


Dual Credit

Tippecanoe School Corporation offers a large selection of courses for dual credit. We continue to look for opportunities to give students options for their educational pursuits. We currently offer three types of dual credit:

  • High School course that meets the requirements of a college level course.
  • College course taught by college faculty at either TSC High School.
  • High School student taking a course at a college campus.


Things to consider when signing up for a dual credit class:

  • This will be put on the student’s college transcript, make sure the student will do well in the course.
  • Check into how this course will transfer into the student’s program of student at the college level.

Students should check on their school website or guidance department to determine which classes are offered at their high school for dual credit. Dual credit offerings are subject to change.


IHSAA Athletic Eligibility

To be scholastically eligible to participate in any high school athletic event, students must have received passing grades at the end of their last grading period in at least five credit subjects and must be currently passing in at least five credit subjects. (Semester grades take precedence)


NCAA Freshman Athletic Eligibility

If students wish to practice and play their freshman year at a NCAA Division I or Division II college, specific requirements must be met. A listing of high school courses, which specifically meet the NCAA Core requirements, may be obtained from the high school athletic director, high school coach or from the NCAA website at www.ncaa.org. These requirements are for NCAA eligibility, not college admission standards. Contact your school counselor for specific admission standards for the college of your choice.

Summer School

The Tippecanoe School Corporation provides a variety of choices for its summer school offerings. Students may register for summer school beginning in February of that year. Offered courses change depending on student interest and registration. Students should consult with school personnel in January for a list of potential summer school courses, registration information, and necessary forms.


Valedictorian Status

Valedictorian status is earned with the TSC Academic Honors with Distinction Diploma and highest GPA of the senior class after 8 semesters.


Community Service

Students working toward an TSC Academic Honors Diploma with Distinction must complete 20 hours or Community Service. Community Service combines student-driven volunteering and service to the community. Community Service must be pre-approved by TSC’s staff. Please see a counselor for details.


TSC Local Graduation Requirements

The TSC requires all students to take a Speech as well as Preparing for College & Careers (PCC) course. Transferring Seniors are waived from taking both courses. Transferring Juniors are waived from taking the PCC class.

Quantitative Reasoning

A quantitative reasoning course is a high school course that “advances a student’s ability to apply mathematics in real world situations and contexts” and that “deepens a student’s understanding of high school mathematics standards.” The Indiana Department of Education requires all students to follow the following guidelines.

  • For the Core 40, Academic Honors (AHD), and Technical Honors (THD) diplomas, students must take a mathematics course or a quantitative reasoning course each year they are enrolled in high school.
  • For the General Diploma, students must earn two credits in a mathematics course or a quantitative reasoning course during their junior or senior year.

The Indiana Department of Education has designed the following courses as Quantitative Reasoning courses:


Quantitative Reasoning Courses


Course Number Course Number
Advanced Placement
Biology/Advanced Placement3020
Calculus AB, Advanced Placement2562
Calculus BC, Advanced Placement2572
Chemistry, Advanced Placement3060
Computer Science A, Advanced Placement4570
Macroeconomics, Advanced Placement1564
Microeconomics, Advanced Placement1566
Physics C, Advanced Placement3088
Statistics, Advanced Placement2570
Agriculture
Advanced Life Science, Animals5070
Agribusiness Management5002
Landscape Management5136
Business, Marketing, and Information Technology
Accounting4524
Business Math4512
Computer Programming I4634
Computer Programming II5236
Computer Science A, Advanced Placement4570
Financial Services5258
Engineering and Technology
PLTWnon PLTW
Aerospace Engineering48165518
Civil Engineering and Architecture48205650
Computer Integrated Manufacturing48105534
Digital Electronics48265538
Engineering Design and Development48285698
Principles of Engineering48145644
Science
Biology, Advanced Placement3020
Chemistry I3064
Chemistry II3066
Chemistry, Advanced Placement3060
Integrated Chemistry-Physics3108
Physics I3084
Physics C, Advanced Placement3088
Social Studies
Economics1514
Macroeconomics, Advanced Placement1564
Microeconomics, Advanced Placement1566


*Quantitative Reasoning courses are subject to change. Courses may not be offered at both high schools.


Mitch Daniels Graduation Scholarship

The Mitch Daniels Early Graduation Scholarship is an educational benefit for students who graduate from a publicly supported high school at least one year early. The scholarship pays $4,000 to be applied first to any remaining unpaid tuition and fees and can be used at any SFA eligible Indiana college. The balance of the scholarship shall be remitted to the student. This is a one-time benefit and may not be renewed. The scholarship may not be used for remedial coursework. Applicable students must:

  • be a resident of Indiana by SFA’s definition;
  • have attended a publicly supported high school on a full time equivalency basis for at least the last two semesters before the student graduated;
  • have had legal settlement in Indiana for at least the last two semesters before the student graduated;
  • have met a least the minimum requirements for granting a high school diploma by the end of grade 11, including any summer courses completed by July 1 of the year of graduation;
  • not be enrolled in a publicly supported high school for any part of grade 12; of the fourth year (12);
  • within five months of graduating from high school become a student in good standing taking classes at a SFA approved college in a program leading to an approved postsecondary degree or credential.


Students with a General Diploma who graduate early are not considered eligible for this scholarship. These students have chosen to “opt-out” of the minimum graduation requirements of Core 40. By graduating early, the students are choosing not to exhaust all other options to meet Core 40 diploma scholarship criteria. Student application for this scholarship must pass the Algebra I and English 10 End of Course Assessments.


Students can apply by completing the Mitch Daniels Early Graduation Scholarship application (State Form 54813) found at http://www.in.gov/ssaci/2504.htm.


Four Year Educational Plan

The grids below are provided to plan the next four years. The computer will arrange your courses when you actually schedule. You may take either 7 classes or 6 classes with a study hall per semester.



TSC Course Offerings

Agricultural Education

Introduction to Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources

DOE: 5056

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $20 per semester

This introductory yearlong course is highly recommended as a prerequisite and foundation for all other agricultural classes. The nature of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the fundamentals of agricultural science and business. Topics covered include: animal science; plant and soil science; food science; horticultural science; farm and agribusiness management; landscape management; natural resources management; agricultural mechanization; and supervised agricultural experi-science. Offered at instructor’s discretion.

AgriBusiness Management

DOE: 5002

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

AgriBusiness Management is a yearlong course, which presents the skills and concepts necessary for managing an agriculture-related business. Concepts covered include: identification of careers in agribusiness; safety management; entrepreneurial skills; the planning, organizing, controlling and directing of the business; economic principles; credit; record keeping; budgeting; taxation; insurance; marketing; professional skills and computer applications in agribusiness. This course is highly recommended for those students participating in the SAE program.


Agricultural Power, Structure and Technology

DOE: 5088

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $20.00

Agricultural Power, Structure and Technology is a yearlong course designed to develop an understanding of basic principles of selecting, operating, maintaining, and managing agricultural production equipment. Topics covered include small gas engine repair, arc welding, concrete, woods, and metals. Students are introduced to career opportunities in agricultural mechanization and related industries. This class is offered at MHS as a one hour block class.


Landscape Management I

DOE: 5136

Credit/s: 2 to 4

Semester/s: 2

Landscape Management is a yearlong course that provides the students with an overview of this field. Students are introduced to procedures used in landscape design, installation and construction, and long-term management of the hardscape and landscape. Students will be introduced to the important skills such as project planning, cost estimations, determination of maintenance schedules, professional skills, as well as proper equipment care and use. Laboratory activities as well as classroom activities will allow for the mastery of these essential skills for homeowners, as well as those students interested in becoming involved in the housing industry. This course may be offered for a two-hour block and four credits per year.


Natural Resources

DOE: 5180

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $20.00 per semester

Natural Resources provides students with a background in natural resource management. Students are introduced to career opportunities in natural resource management and related industries, the history of the forest industry, forest policy, importance and use of forests, forest improvement and management, proper care and use of forest tools, effects of management practices on the environment, soil conservation practices, water and its importance to natural resource and hazardous waste management, native wildlife, waterfowl and fish management, surveying and map use, management of recreational areas, outdoor safety, and weather. Offered at instructor’s discretion.


Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE)

DOE: 5228

Credit/s: Mult.

Semester/s: Varies

Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) is designed to provide students with an opportunity to gain experience in areas of interest that are related to Agriculture, our nation’s largest industrial sector. Students experience classroom material to real situations, as they are involved in placement, laboratory, or entrepreneurial projects. Students work closely with their instructor, employer, and parents while honing essential professional and life skills. This course is offered on an independent study basis and students may have the opportunity to participate during the summer. This course is repeatable for credits.


Animal Science

MHS Only

DOE: 5008

Credit/s: 2 Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $5.00 per semester

This course provides students with an overview of the field of animal science. Students participate in a variety of activities and laboratory work including real and simulated animal science experiences and projects. All areas that the students study can be applied to both large and small animals. Topics include: anatomy and physiology, genetics, reproduction, nutrition, common diseases and parasites, social and political issues related to the industry and management practices for the care and maintenance of animals while incorporating leadership development, supervised agricultural experience and learning about career opportunities in the area of animal science.


Animal Science: (Small Animal Care)

HHS Only

DOE: 5008

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Grades 9-12

Course Fee: $10.00

Animal Science for small animals will provide an overview of how to select, house, feed and care for both small companion and specialty animals. Laboratory experiences, field trips, industry experts and computer software will be used to study dogs, cats, rabbits, birds, reptiles, poultry, fish, llamas, ostriches and other exotic animals. Topics to be discussed include: popular breeds, behavior, anatomy, physiology, genetics, reproduction, nutrition, digestion, feeding, regular health care, common diseases and parasites, small animal careers, and social and political issues related to the industry.


Animal Science (Large Animal Care)

HHS Only

DOE: 5008

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Grades 9-12

Large Animal Science is a course which will discuss careers in the Animal Industry that can provide employment opportunities for you whether it is cattle, swine, sheep or other large animals that are of interest to you. You will learn how to select, house, feed and care for cattle, swine, and sheep. Topics to be discussed include: popular breeds, behavior, anatomy, physiology, genetics, reproduction, nutrition, digestion, feeding, regular health care, common diseases and parasites, equine careers, and social and political issues related to the industry.


Animal Science (Equine Science)

HHS Only

DOE: 5008

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Grades 9-12

If you like working with and showing horses, Equine Science would be an enjoyable course for you. This course studies Animal Science from the viewpoint of persons interested in horses and horsemanship. You will learn how to select, house, feed and care for horses. Topics to be discussed include: popular breeds, behavior, anatomy, physiology, genetics, reproduction, nutrition, digestion, feeding, regular health care, common diseases and parasites, equine careers, and social and political issues related to the industry.


Advanced Life Science, Animals

DOE: 5070

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisites/s: Animal Science

Advanced Life Science, Animals, is a standards-based, interdisciplinary science course that integrates biology, chemistry, and microbiology in an agricultural context. Students enrolled in this course formulate, design, and carry out animal-based laboratory and field investigations as an essential course component. Students investigate key concepts that enable them to understand animal growth, development and physiology as it pertains to agricultural science. This course stresses the unifying themes of both biology and chemistry as students work with concepts associated with animal taxonomy, life at the cellular level, organ systems, genetics, evolution, ecology, and historical and current issues in animal agriculture. Students completing this course will be able to apply the principles of scientific inquiry to solve problems related to biology and chemistry in highly advanced agricultural applications of animal development.


Food Science

DOE: 5102

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $40 per semester

This year long survey course provides an introduction to this rapidly growing field. Principles introduced include food processing, food chemistry, human and animal nutrition, packaging, food commodities, regulations, as well as current and future technologies and trends. These topics will help students understand the role in which food science plays in the securing of a safe, nutritious, and adequate food supply.


Horticultural Science

DOE: 5132

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $10.00 1st Semester $60.00 2nd Semester

The Horticultural Science Laboratory will provide students with an opportunity to utilize the greenhouse and horticultural facilities to better understand topics addressed in the Plant and Soil Science course and to develop horticultural, botanical, and agronomic skills. Students will be involved in the production, management, and sales of seasonal horticultural and nursery crops, laboratories, and greenhouse management. Modern technologies will be introduced and students will be able to use the greenhouse to investigate individual interests.


Plant and Soil Science

DOE: 5170

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $5.00 per semester

Topics to be addressed in this course include soil as a medium for plant growth, principles of plant growth, plant production and propagation, and plant pest control. Students will be involved in laboratory activities in the classroom, greenhouse, land laboratory, and nature center. Students will also be involved in Water Quality Monitoring of local rivers and streams. This course is recommended for students interested in careers in horticulture, agronomy, soil science, natural resources, food and animal science, and landscape management.


Business, Marketing, and Information Technology

Introduction to Business

DOE: 4518

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Grades 9, 10, and 11

Introduction to Business introduces students to the world of business, including concepts, functions, and skills required for meeting the challenges of operating a business in the twenty-first century on a local, national, and/or international scale. The course covers business management, entrepreneurship, marketing fundamentals, and taxes, insurance and economics. The course further develops business vocabulary and provides an overview of business and the role that business plays in economic, social, and political environments.


Introduction to Accounting

DOE: 4524

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Grades 10, 11, and 12

Accounting introduces Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and procedures for proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations using double-entry accounting, with emphasis placed on accounting principles. This course involves understanding, analyzing, and recording business transactions and preparing, analyzing, and interpreting financial reports as a basis for decision making. This course is strongly suggested for those pursuing areas of business in college.


Personal Financial Responsibility

DOE: 4540

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grades 10, 11, and 12

Personal Financial Responsibility addresses the topic of money management of personal financial resources for individuals and families. This course helps students build skills in financial responsibility and decision making. The topics covered will include: sources of income, saving and investing, banking, budgeting, insurance and credit cards, and income taxes.


Advanced Accounting

DOE: 4522

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Junior or Senior and Accounting

The advanced course is primarily designed for students who desire a career in some phase of business upon high school graduation or for the college business major. The course presents more complex and detailed financial accounting procedures. Inventory Valuations, Uncollectibles, Accruals, Depreciation methods, and etc. are all explored. We also cover departmentalized, cost, and tax accounting procedures. The computer is used for several applications along with college level problems


Digital Applications & Responsibility

DOE: 4528

Credit/s: 1 or 2

Semester/s: 1 or 2

This course introduces students to the physical components and operation of computers. Technology is used to build students’ decision- making and problem-solving skills. Features of the Microsoft Office Suite are demonstrated and practiced. Students should be given the opportunity to achieve an industry-recognized digital literacy certification. This course formerly titled Information, Communication & Technology.

If participating in the Vincennes University Early College program this course will provide credit for completion. COMP 110

Web Design

DOE: 4574

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Web Design is a course that provides instruction in the principles of web design using HTML/XHTML and current/emerging software programs. Areas of instruction include audience analysis, hierarchy layout and design techniques, software integration, and publishing.


Computer Illustration and Graphics

DOE: 4516

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Computer Illustration and Graphics introduces students to the computer’s use in visual communication. The focus of the course is on basic computer terminology and use, mastering fundamental skills, and developing efficient working styles. These skills are then developed by creating work with imaging, drawing, interactive, and page layout software. The course includes organized learning experiences that incorporate a variety of visual art techniques as they relate to the design and execution of layouts and illustrations for advertising, displays, promotional materials, and instructional manuals. Instruction also covers advertising theory and preparation of copy, lettering, posters, produce vector illustrations, graphics and logos, and artwork in addition to incorporation of photographic images. Communication skills will be emphasized through the study of effective methods used to design products that impart information and ideas.


Sports and Entertainment Marketing

DOE: 5984

Credit/s: 1 or 2

Semester/s: 1 or 2

Prerequisite/s: Junior and Senior Status

Sports and Entertainment Marketing is a specialized marketing course that develops student understanding of the sport/event industries, their economic impact, and products; distribution systems and strategies; pricing considerations; product/service management, and promotion.


Business Law and Ethics

DOE: 4560

Credit/s: 1 or 2

Semester/s: 1 or 2

Prerequisite/s: Grades 10-12

Business Law and Ethics provides an overview of the legal system in the personal and business setting. Topics covered include: basics of the judicial system, civil, criminal, contract, personal, employment, and property law. Applications of legal principles and ethical decisions are presented through situation analysis.


Principles of Business Management

DOE: 4562

Credit/s: 1 or 2

Semester/s: 1 or 2

Prerequisite/s: Grades 11 and 12

Principles of Business Management focuses on the roles and responsibilities of managers as well as opportunities and challenges of ethically managing a business in the free enterprise system. Students will attain an understanding of management, team building, leadership, problem solving steps and processes that contribute to the achievement of organizational goals. The management of human and financial resources is emphasized.


Computer Science A, AP or College Credit: JAVA (Semester I)

HHS Only

DOE: 4570

Credit/s: 1 Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Q Basic I & II

This course covers C++ programming methodology including a study of built-in types. Successful completion of this course prepares the student for the Advanced Placement Computer Science A exam. Students desiring the AB exam need to take the Semester II course.


Work Based Learning, Business-Marketing

MHS Only

DOE: 5260

Credit/s: 6

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Senior in good standing and permission of the program coordinator

Course Fee: $35.00

Work Based Learning, Business & Marketing is a two-semester vocational business program offering the student the opportunity to gain “real world” attitudes, skills, and knowledge through paid on-the-job training in an office or retail position and related classroom instruction. Students participating in this internship program will follow class, state, and federal guidelines, and will be paid in accordance with all state and federal laws pertaining to employment. This program is divided into two areas: Related Classroom instruction and On-the-Job training. The related class, which the student will take during their half-day in school, will earn the student one (1) credit per semester. The on-the-job training will earn the student two (2) credits per semester for a total of six (6) credits for the year. The student will work an average of 15 hours per week or more.


Business Math

DOE: 4512

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

This class does not count as a Math credit. It does count as a quantitative reasoning course.

Business Math is a business course designed to develop the ability to solve real world problems in order to become productive citizens and works in a technological society. Areas of study to be included are number relationships and operations, patterns in algebra, measurements, and statistics and probability. Problem solving applications will be used to analyze and solve problems.

Second semester will include problem-solving applications in the following areas: taxation, savings and investments, payroll records, cash management, financial statements, purchases, sales, inventory records, and depreciation.


Computer Science II: Programming

HHS Only

DOE: 5236

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Computer Science I/BASIC

This is a continuation of Computer Science I. Students will learn to write and debug programs involving menus, control-breaks, sequential data files, and random access data files.


Computer Science, AB, AP or College Credit: JAVA (Semester II)

HHS Only

DOE: 4586

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: C++ Semester I

Topics include a continuation of Semester I topics plus advanced data structures, algorithms, object-oriented programming and pointers. Successful completion of this course prepares the student for the Advanced Placement Computer Science AB exam.


Career, Technical, Trade, and Industrial Education

Programs marked with an "*" offer dual credit with select post-secondary institutions.

Interdisciplinary Cooperative Education (ICE)

DOE: 5902

Credit/s: 6

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Enrolled in Gr. 12 and permission of program coordinator

Course Fee: $36.00

ICE is a CTE work-based learning program designed for career exploration and preparation that combines classroom and workplace instruction. The two components are the in-school related class and the on-the-job training in the community. The program encompasses 16 career clusters; whereby students can acquire employability skills such as knowledge, technical and transferrable skills related to the individual student’s career goals. The ICE program enables students to develop career skills, adjust to the workplace environment, and advance in the career of their choice. Students may also choose to participate in a career and technical education youth organization.

The related class, which all students take during their half-day in school, will earn the student one (1) credit per semester. The on-the-job training earns the student two (2) credits per semester for a total of six (6) credits for the school year. The student is required to work a minimum of 15 hours per week.


Work-Based Learning Multiple Pathways

DOE: 5974

Credits/s: 1-3 per semester/Max 6 credits

Provides students the opportunity to apply the concepts and skills learned in previous coursework in their career pathway to real world business and industry settings. At least two courses in a student’s pathway would be required for the student to enroll in the course. Work Based Learning can include paid or non-paid internships. Paid internships must follow federal and state student employment and cooperative education laws.


*Construction Trades I & II

DOE: 5580 (CTI) & 5578 (CTII)

Credit/s: 6

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Enrolled in Grade 11 and Grade 12, permission of Administration

This course is offered to juniors and seniors interested in learning about construction work and the building of homes. The course covers wiring, plumbing, painting, and heating of homes. The class meets for three hours per day and gives three credits per semester. Practical experience is provided by actual on-the-job construction.

Cosmetology I

DOE: 5802

Credit/s: 5

Semester/s: 3 Credits Fall, 2 Credits Summer

Prerequisite/s: Enrolled in Grade 12, permission of Administration

Cosmetology is a vocational course to prepare students to pass the state examination and become licensed cosmetologists. Students will attend regular classes at their high school half days and will receive training at a local beauty school the other half day. They will attend beauty school all day on Saturdays. Students will begin their training in June before their senior year and will be able to take their state exam at the completion of 1,500 hours. The State Board requires 4 hours a day and 20 hours per week. Students are responsible for their own transportation. Students who complete the program and pass the state exam will receive a state license to practice.


Cosmetology II

DOE: 5806

Credit/s: 3

Semester/s: 3 Credits Spring

Prerequisite/s: Cosmetology I Cosmetology II covers the development of advanced skills in styling, hair coloring, permanent waving, facials and manicuring.

Students will also study anatomy and physiology, professionalism, and salon management in relation to cosmetology.


*Graphic Design & Layout A

MHS Only

DOE: 5550

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Course Fee: $10.00

This class includes organized learning experiences that incorporate a variety of visual art techniques as they relate to the design and execution of layouts and illustration for advertising, displays, promotional materials, and instructional manuals. Instruction also covers advertising theory and preparation of copy, lettering, posters, and artwork in addition to incorporation of photographic images. Communication skills will be emphasized through the study of effective methods used to design commercial products that impart information and ideas. Students will use Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Indesign software to produce their work. Advanced instruction might also include experiences in screen printing, dye, sublimation, and pre-press and post-press activities.

This class will also be given for Dual Credit thru Vincennes University DESN 140 Computer Imaging.


*Graphic Design & Layout B

MHS Only

DOE: 5550

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Completion of Graphic Design & Layout A

Course Fee: $10.00

This is a continuation of the introduction to the printing and publishing industries and operations started in Graphic Design & Layout A. This class includes organized learning experiences that incorporate a variety of visual art techniques as they relate to the design and execution of layouts and illustrations for advertising, displays, promotional materials, and instructional manuals. Instruction also covers advertising theory and preparation of copy, lettering, posters, and artwork in addition to incorporation of photographic images. Communication skills will be emphasized through the study of effective methods used to design commercial products that impart information and ideas. Students will use Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Indesign software to produce their work. Advanced instruction might also include experiences in screen printing, dye sublimation, and pre-press and post-press activities.

This class will also be given for Dual Credit thru Vincennes University DESN 155 Computer Page Layout


Graphic Imaging Technology- Advanced Imaging

MHS Only

DOE: 5572

Credit/s: 2-4

Semester/s: 1-2

Prerequisite/s: Graphic Design & Layout A & Graphic Design & Layout B or recommendation of instructor

Students will study and have hands-on work on equipment such Digital Printing, digital paste-up and finish & bindery equipment. Equipment repair, setup, and terminology used in industry will be covered. Students will be doing production work and studying preventive maintenance, supply ordering, billing procedures, estimating jobs, and occupational opportunities. This course will develop skills for in the graphic arts/design area.


Auto Services Technology I

MHS Only

DOE: 5510

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $15.00

This introductory automotive course is for students who want to know what makes an automobile work, as well as what is involved with owning an automobile. This course is a consumer-oriented class in the automotive field. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of operation of the different automotive parts, components and systems. Instructional units include principles of operation of the internal combustion engine, power trains, electrical fundamentals and systems, and rights and responsibilities of automobile ownership. Material is presented through lecture and demonstration with some hands-on experience where applicable. In the second semester, students will learn about and work with charging systems, electrical trouble-shooting, basic ignition systems, carburetor theory, and simulated overhaul. Students will be involved in making and testing of classroom simulators, and performing preventative maintenance operations on automobiles. Additional instruction on tools and safety will be covered.


Auto Services Technology- Block I

MHS Only

DOE: 5510

Credit/s: 4

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Junior Status & successful completion of Auto Svcs Tech I and recommendation of instructor

Auto Services Technology - Block is a course consisting of a block of two hours. This course is intended for those students interested in the field of automobile mechanics through classroom study and laboratory experiences. Instructional units cover job opportunities, automotive history, engine design and clutches, steering, brakes, etc.


Auto Services Technology- Block II

MHS Only

DOE: 5546

Credit/s: 4

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Senior Status & successful completion of Auto Services Tech. Block I with recommendation of instructor

Auto Services Technology – Block II builds on the curriculum and knowledge of Auto Services Technology Block I.


Computer Tech Support

DOE: 5230

Credit/s: 4

Semester/s: 2

Computer Tech Support allows students to explore how computers work. Students learn the functionality of hardware and software components as well as suggested best practices in maintenance and safety issues. Through hands-on activities and labs, students learn how to assemble and configure a computer, install operating systems and software, and troubleshoot hardware and software problems.


Networking I

DOE: 5234

Credit/s: 4

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Recommended for students in senior status, who have taken Computer Tech Support

Networking I introduces students to concepts of local and wide area networks, home networking, networking standards using the IEEE/OSI Model, network protocols, transmission media and network architecture/topologies. Security and data integrity will be introduced and emphasized throughout this course. The purpose of this course is to offer students the critical information needed to successfully move into a role as an IT professional supporting networked computers. Concepts covered will include TCP/IP client administration, planning a network topology, configuring the TCP/IP protocol, managing network clients, configuring routers and hubs as well as creating a wireless LAN.

Health Science Education I

DOE: 5282

Credit/s: 4-6/semester

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Senior status & Completion of Human Development & Wellness

Health Science Education I covers skills common to specific health career topics such as patient nursing care, dental care, animal care, medical laboratory, public health, an introduction to health care systems, anatomy, physiology, and medical terminology. Leadership skills developed through HOSA participation are also included. Lab experiences are organized and planned around the activities associated with the student’s career objectives. Job seeking and job maintenance skills, personal management skills, self-analysis to aid in career selection and completion of the application process for admission into a post-secondary program of choice is also included.


Health Science Education II: Nursing

DOE: 5284

Credit/s: 4

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Personal Transportation Required to Off-Site Health Care Facility

Health Science Education II: Nursing is an extended laboratory experience at a facility that provides instruction in CNA certification. Students will have experiences in other health care facilities in a variety of health careers. It prepares students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes essential for providing basic care in extended care facilities, hospitals and home health agencies under the direction of licensed nurses. These knowledge and skills include recording patient medical histories and symptoms, providing medicine and treatments, consulting doctors, operating and monitoring medical equipment, performing diagnostic tests, teaching patients and families how to manage illness or injury, and perform general health screenings.


Medical Terminology

DOE: 5274

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Personal Transportation Required to Off-Site Health Care Facility

Medical Terminology prepares students with language skills necessary for effective, independent use of health and medical reference materials. It includes the study of health and medical abbreviations, symbols, and Greek and Latin word part meanings taught within the context of body systems. This course builds skills in pronouncing, spelling, and defining new words encountered in verbal and written information. Students have the opportunity to acquire skills in interpreting medical records and communications accurately and logically. Emphasis is on forming a foundation for a medical vocabulary including meaning, spelling, and pronunciation. Medical abbreviations, signs, and symbols are included.


Emergency Medical Services (EMS)

DOE: 5210

Credit/s: 6

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Personal Transportation Required to Off-Site Health Care Facility. Senior Status Only

Emergency Medical Services prepares students for a State certification which could lead to a career in Emergency Medical Services such as an Emergency Medical Technician or a Paramedic. This course is designed for persons desiring to perform emergency medical care. Students will learn to recognize the seriousness of the patient’s condition, use the appropriate emergency care techniques and equipment to stabilize the patient, and transport them to the hospital.

This course also addresses the handling of victims of hazardous materials accidents. It covers theories, techniques, and operational aspects of pre-hospital emergency care with the scope and responsibility of the basic emergency medical technician. It requires laboratory practice and clinical observation in a hospital emergency room and ambulance. Participation in HOSA affords the student the opportunity to compete in a variety of competitive events, specifically CPR/First Aid and EMT, at both the state and national level.

Fire & Rescue I

DOE: 5820

Credit/s: 6

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Personal Transportation to Off-Site Facility

Fire and Rescue I will provide students with knowledge of service positions in protecting the public against dangers associated with fires and other emergencies. Curriculum will include a variety of topics for the student to prepare to gain Indiana state fire certifications: 1) Mandatory, 2) Firefighter, 3) Firefighter II, 4) Hazardous Materials Awareness, and 5) Hazardous Materials

Operations.


Career and Technical Education (Campus Based Dual Credit)

Students will earn high school credit & college credit

Advanced Manufacturing I (Ivy Tech)

DOE: 5608

Credit/s: 6

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Senior status

The Advanced Manufacturing program offers students the opportunity to gain knowledge and skills in the basic manufacturing process. MSSC instruction and certification prepares students to continue preparing for a manufacturing or technology career through the

Certified Production Technician process. Students will need to pay for books and supplies at Ivy Tech.

ADMF 101: Key Principles of ADMF

ADMF 102: Technology in ADMF (MSSC)

ADMF 103: Graphic Communications for Manufacturing

ADMF 113: Electrical & Electronic Principles for Mfg.


Architectural Drafting & Design (Ivy Tech)

DOE: 5640

Credit/s: 6

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Senior status

Students enrolled in fundamental classes for a variety of design programs of study. Students will need to pay for books and supplies at Ivy Tech.

DESN 102: Technical Graphics

DESN 103: CAD Fundamentals

DESN 104: Mechanical Graphics

DESN 113: Intermediate CAD


Construction Trades: HVAC I (Ivy Tech)

DOE: 5496

Credit/s: 6

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Senior status

Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration provides training in heat pump and cooling service, blueprint reading, electrical circuits and controls, duct fabrication and installation, heat loss and gain calculation, service organization and management, and equipment sales. Students will need to pay for books and supplies at Ivy Tech.

HVAC 101: Heating Foundations

HVAC 103: Refrigeration

HVAC 208: Heating Services

HVAC 211: Refrigeration II


Sustainable Energy Alternative (Ivy Tech)

DOE: 5229

Credit/s: 6

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s Senior status. Students will need to pay for books and supplies at Ivy Tech


FallSustainable Energy AlternativesDOE 54962 Credits
SpringAdvanced Career & Technical EducationDOE 52381 Credit
Advanced Career & Technical EducationDOE 52383 Credit
Basic ElectricityINDT 113
Introduction to the Energy IndustrySUST 101


Spring courses will be selected to align with the sustainable Energy Program of Study for Wind Alternative Energy or Fuel Alternative Energy.


Welding Technology (Ivy Tech)

DOE: 5776

Credit/s: 6

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Senior status

The welding specialty in the Industrial Technology Program is designed to teach you skills in many types of welding processes. This specialty gives students a quality education using technology currently in the workplace. Students will need to pay for books and supplies at Ivy Tech.

INDT 114: Introductory Welding

WELD 108: Shielded Metal Arc Welding I

WELD 207: Gas Metal Arc (MIG) Welding

WELD 208: Gas Tungsten Arc (TIG) Welding II


Criminal Justice I (Ivy Tech)

DOE: 5822

Credit/s: 3 credits per semester

Semester/s: 2 required

Recommended Grade Level: 11,12

This course introduces specialized classroom and practical experiences related to public safety occupations such as law enforcement, loss prevention services, and homeland security. This course provides an introduction to the purposes, functions, and history of the three primary parts of the criminal justice system as well as an introduction to the investigative process. Oral and written communication skills should be reinforced through activities that model public relations and crime prevention efforts as well as the preparation of police reports. This course provides the opportunity for dual credit for students who meet postsecondary requirements for earning dual credit and successfully complete the dual credit requirements of this course. Students will need to pay for books and supplies at Ivy Tech.


Criminal Justice II (Ivy Tech)

DOE: 5824

Credit/s: 3 credits per semester

Semester/s: 2 required

Prerequisite(s): Criminal Justice I

This course introduces students to concepts and practices in traffic control as well as forensic investigation at crime scenes. Students will have opportunities to use mathematical skills in crash reconstruction and analysis activities requiring measurements and performance of speed/acceleration calculations. Additional activities simulating criminal investigations will be used to teach scientific knowledge related to anatomy, biology, and chemistry as well as collection of evidence, developing and questioning suspects, and protecting the integrity of physical evidence found at the scene and while in transit to a forensic science laboratory. Procedures for the use and control of informants, inquiries keyed to basic leads, and other information-gathering activities and chain of custody procedures will also be reviewed. This course provides the opportunity for dual credit for students who meet postsecondary requirements for earning dual credit and successfully complete the dual credit requirements of this course. Students will need to pay for books and supplies at Ivy Tech.


Industrial Automation and Robotics I (Ivy Tech)

DOE: 5610

Credit/s: 3 credits per semester

Semester/s: 2 required

Recommended Grade Level: 11,12

Students will gain skills to design and build concepts in basic robots that use sensors and actuators to solve specific problems and complete specific tasks. This will include introductory programming autonomous mode. Students will also learn to program a humanoid robot, tethered and in autonomous mode, able to react to specific circumstances and perform human-like tasks when programming is complete. This course will provide fundamentals in industrial robotics basic programming and operations. Students will program an industrial robot through explanation of a teach pendant and use proper programming commands with hands-on utilization of an industrial robot. This course will provide fundamental knowledge and skills in basic lasers, pneumatics, hydraulics,mechanics, basic electronics, and programmable logic controllers along with an understanding of career pathways in this sector. Students will need to pay for books and supplies at Ivy Tech.


Industrial Technical Maintenance I (Vincennes University)

DOE: 5686

Credit/s: 3 credits per semester

Semester/s: 2 required

Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Manufacturing

Recommended Grade Level: 11,12

This course includes classroom and practical experiences that prepare students to apply technical knowledge and skills to repair and maintain industrial machinery and equipment. Instructional activities develop diagnostic and problem-solving skills related to electric circuits, wiring, motors, robotics, hydraulics, and pneumatics. Additional areas of instruction should include plumbing, rigging, basic machining, welding and cutting. Students will need to pay for books and supplies at Vincennes University.


Engineering and Technology Education

Introduction to Manufacturing

HHS Only

DOE: 4784

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Course Fee: $25.00

Students will work with wood, plastic, metal, ceramic materials, and a variety of tools to produce products they have designed. Students will learn about designing products, the manufacturing process, materials used in manufacturing, and production techniques. Students will be introduced to the manufacturing industry and its relationships with individuals, society, and the environment.


Introduction to Manufacturing

HHS Only

DOE: 4784

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Course Fee: $25.00

Students will work with wood, plastic, metal, ceramic materials, and a variety of tools to produce products they have designed. Students will learn about designing products, the manufacturing process, materials used in manufacturing, and production techniques. Students will be introduced to the manufacturing industry and its relationships with individuals, society, and the environment.

Communication Systems

HHS Only

DOE: 4780

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Course Fee: $15.00

Students learn about a variety of communication technologies including graphic electronic systems. Students will use computers to create layouts for printed materials including tee-shirts and produce a video using a video camera, VCR, and audio equipment; and work with an active satellite TV system. Students will be introduced to a wide variety of techniques used to communicate ideas, knowledge, and information, and examine the impacts on individuals in society.


Construction Systems

HHS Only

DOE: 4782

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Course Fee: $20.00

This course provides students with an overview of the practices used to construct structures from approved plans. Emphasis is placed on construction processes and materials used to produce residential, commercial, industrial, and civil structures. Focus will be placed on steps that follow the design phase including: preparing the site, setting foundations, building the superstructure, installing electrical and mechanical systems, enclosing and finishing the structure, and completing the project. Course activities also cover methods of managing the project including planning, organizing, controlling, scheduling, monitoring, and directing of all construction phases. Additionally, this course provides students with an overview of contemporary design construction practices and principles. Emphasis is placed on site evaluation, selection, and acquisition; designing and engineering structures; writing construction specifications; estimating and bidding; and construction scheduling. This course is directed toward students who are interested in solving problems related to designing constructed projects. Students will learn how to use the Project Delivery Process (PDP) to design low-rise buildings and civil projects. Students simulate working in an architecture/engineering office that is organized into design teams and under the direction of a project manager.


Transportation Systems

HHS Only

DOE: 4786

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Course Fee: $25.00

Students will be given the opportunity to investigate the systems used to move goods and people on land and water and through air and space. They will also study energy systems as they apply to transportation and other uses. Activities will include designing, constructing, and testing various transportation vehicles; constructing and testing solar, wind, fluid, and air powered devices.

Introduction to Communication

DOE: 4790

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2 Semesters must be completed in sequential order, but may be completed during different academic years if necessary.

Course Fee: $40.00

This course provides an overview of graphic communications systems. Emphasis is placed on processes used to produce communication products in both printed and broadcast media. Students will be provided with the opportunity to design, produce and deliver media messages using a variety of communication technologies, and analyze the impacts of these messages and their audiences. The latest in technological equipment is teaching the students their techniques.


Introduction to Construction

DOE: 4792

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Construction Systems and/or Instructor Recommendation. Semesters must be completed in sequential order, but may be completed during different academic years if necessary.

Course Fee: $50.00

This course explores technological processes used to plan and produce residential and commercial structures. Information on materials, occupations, and professional organizations within the industry will be covered. Students will be introduced to and develop basic knowledge and skills currently used in the industry. Studies will also focus on the design and construction of building types including residential and commercial.

Introduction to Adv. Manufacturing and Logistics

DOE: 4796

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Semesters must be completed in sequential order, but may be completed during different academic years if necessary.

Course Fee: $60.00

This course provides students with an introduction to the properties of industrial materials and the processes used to produce standard stock (primary processes) and the processes used to produce finished products (secondary processes). The students will learn about manufacturing input, the concept of material conversion, families of industrial materials, and classifications of manufacturing processes of polymeric, metallic, ceramic, and composite materials. Students will also perform activities in the research and development of products. Other student activities include an introduction to organizing, financing, and managing a manufacturing enterprise, producing a finished product, and marketing a product.

Additionally, this course is designed to allow the students to study the sequential tasks that change a designer's idea into a completed product. Emphasis is placed upon the study of the design of a product and the manufacturing system needed to produce it. The students will be involved in activities that allow them to design and engineer products, select and sequence operations, design tooling, develop quality control systems, develop plant layouts, produce products, and analyze the manufacturing system.


Introduction to Transportation

DOE: 4798

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $ 60.00

Semesters must be completed in sequential order, but may be completed during different academic years if necessary. An introductory course designed to help students become familiar with fundamental principles in modes of land, sea, air, and space transportation, including basic mechanical skills and processes involved in transportation of people, cargo and goods. Students will gain and apply knowledge and skills in the safe application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems as it relates to the transportation industries. Content of this course includes the study of how transportation impacts individuals, society, and the environment. This course allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant transportation related activities, problems, and settings.


Introduction to Design Processes

DOE: 4794

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of at least one of the following: Introduction to Communication, Introduction to Construction, Introduction to Manufacturing, Introduction to Transportation, and/or the recommendation of instructor.

Course Fee: $40.00

This course explores the use of the design process to solve engineering and technology related problems. Students from Construction, Manufacturing, Transportation, and Communication will combine their knowledge and skill sets to work as a team to solve these problems. Students will identify problems, brainstorm solutions, design and prototype ideas, test and evaluate their products, and then seek feedback from peers and mentors. Students will develop or enhance their skills related to 3D modeling and design, hands on construction, and communication with a target audience.


Computers in Design and Production

DOE: 4800

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Introduction to Design Processes, or with recommendation of instructor

Course Fee: $ 60.00

This course focuses on using computer systems in producing drawings and specifications for products and structures and in controlling automated production systems. The emphasis is placed on specialized use of computer-aided drafting and design (CADD) and its use in modern industry. Students will learn to do working drawings, advanced pictorials, architectural drawings, and the use of Computer- aided drafting (CAD) in three-dimensional (3-D) modeling. The course is recommended for students interested in a career in CAD, engineering, graphic design, or other work-related jobs.


Technology and Society

HHS Only

DOE: 4804

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Introduction to Communication and/or the recommendation of the instructor

This course provides interested students with an introduction to the principles and practices of industrial research and development and an opportunity to conduct research and development projects in any of the four industrial/technological cluster areas of communication, construction, manufacturing, and transportation.


Technology Enterprises

DOE: 4806

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Introduction to Communication and Technology and Society, and/or recommendation of instructor

This course provides students with an opportunity to design, plan, and produce communication media products. Emphasis is placed on the integration of graphic and electronic communication media products. This course explores the various technical means used to link societies and peoples. Students will be given an overview of communication technology, the way it has evolved, how messages are designed and produced, and how industries profit from the creation of information services and products.


Design Fundamental

DOE: 4834

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Technology Enterprises

Course Fee: $40.00

This course introduces students to fundamental design theory. Investigations into design theory and color dynamics will provide experiences in applying design theory, ideas and creative problem solving in the areas of communication technology. Student learning experiences encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production which lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art in areas of communication; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills.


PLTW: Introduction to Engineering Designs

DOE: 4812

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: 8th Grade Algebra or currently enrolled in Algebra I

Course Fee: $ 40.00

Introduction to Engineering Design is an introductory course which develops student problem solving skills with emphasis placed upon the concept of developing a 3-D model or sold rendering of an object. Students focus on the application of visualization processes and tools provided by modern, state-of-the-art computer hardware and software, Inventor. This modern computer-based process replaces the traditional hand drawing methods. The course will emphasize the design development process of a product and how a model of that product is produced, analyzed and evaluated, using a Computer Aided Design System. Various design applications will be explored with discussion of possible career opportunities.


PLTW: Principles of Engineering

DOE: 4814

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Introduction to Engineering Design or Instructor Approval

Course Fee: $40.00

Principles of Engineering is a course that helps students understand the field of engineering/engineering technology. Exploring various technology systems and manufacturing processes help students learn how engineers and technicians use math, science and technology in an engineering problem solving process to benefit people. The course also includes concerns about social and political consequences of technological change.


PLTW: Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) (Ivy Tech)

DOE: 4810

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: IED and POE and college preparatory Mathematics and English

(CIM) is the third course in the Project Lead The Way curriculum. This course applies principles of robotics and automation. The course builds on computer solid modeling skills developed in IED and the applied math, science and technology skills learned in POE. Students will use CNC, Computer Numerical Control, and equipment to produce actual models of their three-dimensional designs. Fundamental concepts of robotics used in automated manufacturing, and design analysis are also covered. This is a one semester accelerated course. Students who successfully complete CIM will earn 3 Ivy Tech Community College credits for CIM 102 – Introduction to Robotics. Students will need to pay for books and supplies at Ivy Tech.


PLTW: Digital Electronics

DOE: 4826

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: IED and POE, Grade 11

This course introduces students to applied digital logic, a key element of careers in engineering and engineering technology. This course explores the smart circuits found in watches, calculators, video games, and computers. Students use industry-standards computer software in testing and analyzing digital circuitry. They design circuits to solve problems, export their designs to a printed circuit auto-routing program that generates printed circuit boards, and use appropriate components to build their designs. Students use mathematics and science in solving real-world engineering problems. This course covers several topics, including: analog and digital fundamentals, number systems and binary addition, logic gates and functions, Boolean algebra and circuit design, and decoders, multiplexers and de-multiplexers.


PLTW: Civil Engineering and Architecture (CEA)

DOE: 4820

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: IED and POE. Grade 11

Course Fee: $40.00

The major focus of course is a long-term project that involves the development of a local property site. Students will apply what they learn to the design and development of this property. The course provides freedom to the teacher and students to develop the property as a simulation or to students to model the real-world experiences that civil engineers and architects experience when developing property. The course provides students a variety of experiences and overview of both fields. Students work in teams, exploring hands- on projects to learn the characteristics of civil engineering and architecture. In addition, students use Rivit, a state of the art 3D design software package from AutoDesk, to help design solutions to solve their major course project. Students learn about documenting projects, solving problems, and communicating their solutions to peers and members of the professional community of civil engineering and architecture. The course of study includes: the roles of civil engineers and architects, project planning, site planning, building design, and project documentation and presentation. The CEA course is intended as a specialization course within the PLTW sequence.


PLTW: Aerospace Engineering Technology (AET)

DOE: 4816

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Grade 11-12 and Completion of two PLTW courses

Course Fee: $60.00

Aerospace Engineering Technology provides students with fundamental knowledge and experience to apply mathematical, scientific, and engineering principles to design, development, and evaluation of aircraft, space vehicles and their operating systems. Emphasis is on investigation and research of flight characteristics, analysis of aerodynamic design, and impact of this technology on the environment. Classroom instruction provides creative thinking and problem-solving activities via design, test, and evaluation of a variety of air and space vehicles, their systems, and launching, guidance and control procedures. Only those schools having a signed agreement with the national Project Lead The Way organization can use this course title


PLTW: Engineering Design and Development

DOE: 4828

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: CEA or Digital Electronics, Grade 12

Course Fee: $60.00

In this course, teams of students spend the year solving problems of their own choosing. The teams apply principles developed in the four preceding Project Lead the Way core courses and are guided by a community mentor. They brainstorm possibilities, research current patents and regulations, construct a working model, test the model in real life situations (or simulation), document their designs,and present and defend the design to a panel of experts.


Computer Science I

DOE: 4801

Credit/s: 1 per semester

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: None

Course Fee: $20.00 per Semester

This course will be composed of 4 units. Unit 1) Graphics will introduce fundamental computer science concepts. Students will engage problems utilizing software such as Scratch to create online programs like games, text-based adventures and other program types. Unit 2) Web Design and Information Technology will introduce code writing, networking concepts, privacy, and security. Students will use tools like HTML/CSS, or JavaScript to create interactive Web pages that will use as a place to display all of their course work. Unit 3) Information Science will introduce concepts in discrete mathematics, probability, and date visualization. It will emphasize how computational thinking affects every discipline, as computational thinking can put existing code to great use. Students will use database of genetic information and health records, will utilize a face-recognition API, and will use APPInventor to develop their own Android phone app. Unit 4) Modeling will further develop the concepts in discrete mathematic and introduce computability, and artificial intelligence. Students will engage problems using Python to simulate the physical world.


English/Language Arts

English 9: Basic

DOE: 1002

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

This course is designed to improve the oral and written communication skills of students who have difficulty with English. Students will write at least 4 compositions including narration, description, and a character analysis. A study of grammar will be included. Literature units will include the novel, drama, biography, autobiography, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.


English 9

DOE: 1002

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

Prerequisite/s: None

English 9 is designed to improve all language arts skills, grammar, spelling/vocabulary, literature/reading, composition, and oral communication. Literature units include Romeo and Juliet, Animal Farm, The Odyssey, mythology, poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.


English 9: Academic

MHS Only

DOE: 1002

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Teacher Recommendation

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

English 9 Academic, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English Language Arts in Grade 9 and the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring a wide-variety of genres and their elements. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 9 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Literature units include Romeo and Juliet, To Kill a Mockingbird, Animal Farm, The Odyssey and other works of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Students write short stories, responses to literature, expository and argumentative/persuasive compositions, research reports, business letters, and technical documents. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information. Students work in small and large group settings.

Recommended Prerequisites: Accelerated English at the middle school level, teacher recommendation, English grades


English 9: Honors

DOE: 1002

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

Registration is by application and nomination only. Selection is based upon standardized test scores, English grades, and teacher recommendations. The course is literature-based with challenging written and oral projects throughout the year. Vocabulary and composition are emphasized. Major works in this course include The Odyssey, To Kill a Mockingbird, Great Expectations, Romeo and Juliet, The Chosen, and Animal Farm. Students will complete a research paper, create a media project, and present their work orally. Grammar, mechanics, and usage will be included as necessary. Students are expected to read regularly, work independently, think critically and creatively, and participate in class discussions.


English 10: Basic

DOE: 1004

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

Basic English 10 is for students who have difficulty with English and does not count toward Core 40 Diploma. The course is designed to build upon oral and written communication skills developed in the 9th grade Basic English. Literature units and longer compositions, including process, persuasion, and exposition, will be included.


English 10

DOE: 1004

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

English 10, designed to build upon the skills acquired in English 9, provides further instruction in the fundamentals of literature, grammar, composition, and spelling/vocabulary. All genres of literature are included in this course; specifically, one Shakespearean play and one novel will be studied.


English 10: Academic

MHS Only

DOE: 1004

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

English 10 Academic, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards English Language Arts in Grade 10 and the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring universal themes across a wide variety of genres. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 10 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write short stories, responses to literature, expository and argumentative/persuasive compositions, research reports, business letters, and technical documents. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information. Literature units include A Midsummer Night’s Dream or Julius Caesar, Lord of the Flies, Cry, the Beloved Country, and other poetry, fiction, and nonfiction selections.

Recommended Prerequisites: English 9 Academic or teacher recommendation


English 10: Honors

DOE: 1004

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: English 9 Honors

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

Registration is by application and nomination only. Selection will be based upon standardized test scores, English grades, and teacher recommendations. The course is literature-based with challenging written and oral projects throughout the year. Vocabulary and composition are emphasized. Independent study will constitute an important aspect of this class, thereby allowing students to explore concepts with creative projects of their own design. Readings may include The Canterbury Tales, Dandelion Wine, Macbeth, Doctor Faustus, Antigone, Lord of the Flies, Cyrano de Bergerac, and Cry, the Beloved Country. Students will research topics, analyze literature, write essays, lead discussions, master vocabulary, and synthesize information. Formal mechanics, grammar, and usage instructions will be included as necessary.


Speech

DOE: 1076

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Speech is a required course designed to introduce the student to the elements of oral communication and to develop the student’s competence and confidence in formal and informal group and individual speaking situations. Evaluation will be based upon the student’s oral performance, individual effort and progress, group participation, and written assignments.


Basic Speech

DOE: 1076

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Basic Speech follows the same course direction as Speech, but is designed for students who may require additional assistance in reading, writing skills such as outlining, and speaking in public situations.


English 11: Basic

DOE: 1006

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

This course, designed for students who experience difficulty in reading, builds upon skills developed in the 9th and 10th grade Basic English classes. This course does not count toward Core 40 Diploma. American Literature is the focus of the reading in 11th grade. A variety of genres will be included: poetry, nonfiction, drama, short stories, and the novel. Also included are longer compositions and a limited research paper/project.


English 11

DOE: 1006

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

English 11 is designed to give students an in-depth understanding and appreciation for eras, genres, concepts and authors in the history of American literature. Poetry, nonfiction, drama, short stories, and a novel are included each semester with emphasis on reading comprehension and literary analysis. Students will complete a minimum of six compositions including a research project or paper. Students will organize and present ideas effectively both orally and in writing according to the specific purposes of the assignment. Vocabulary study is a core component of the course.


English 11: Academic

DOE: 1006

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

This is a literature/composition course designed to give students a comprehensive understanding and appreciation of the world of American authors. Using either a chronological or thematic approach, teachers will guide students in examining ideas and events that have helped to shape American literature. Students will read at least one novel and write a minimum of six compositions including an in-depth, literature-based research paper or project.


English 11: Honors

HHS Only

DOE: 1006

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: English 10 Honors

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

Registration by application and nomination only. Selection is based upon standardized test scores, English grades, and teacher recommendation. This course will cover American writers of all time periods and all genres. Emphasis will be on the American Dream and the various ways it is portrayed in literature as well as how it has changed according to time and author. In addition to the selections in the anthology, students will read several novels. In the past, these have included The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Scarlet Letter, The Grapes of Wrath, Moby Dick, A Farewell to Arms, and The Great Gatsby. Students will write a minimum of six compositions, including modeling of authors’ styles and a documented literature-based research paper or project. Students will also learn literacy terms and analytical techniques, applying these in timed writing responses to sample Advanced Placement exam prompts.


English 11: Language & Composition A/P

MHS Only

DOE: 1056

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: English 10 Honors, Registration by application and nomination only

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

This course will focus on preparing students to “write effectively and confidently in their college courses across the curriculum and in their professional and personal lives” (The College Board, AP English course Description) through a rigorous study of predominantly American fictional literature and nonfiction documents. The class emphasizes refining skills or rhetorical analysis and expression through various composition modes. The intensive literary study emphasizes in-depth oral and written analyses including brief, informal responses that explore basic understanding; formal essays that interpret and evaluate meaning; timed, practice AP exams; and lengthy, researched arguments-all produced in the context of instructor guidance and feedback. As the equivalent of an introductory freshman-level composition course in universities, AP English Language & Composition demands that students read critically, think analytically, and communicate clearly both in writing and speech.


English 12: Basic

DOE: 1008

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

This course is designed to build upon and improve oral and written communication skills developed in 9th, 10th, and 11th grade Basic English classes. This course does not count toward Core 40 Diploma. The course will include appropriate literature and composition units, as well as practical communication skills—writing a resume, filling out forms, completing applications, and practicing for job interviews.


English 12

DOE: 1008

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

English 12 is a composition course designed to prepare students for postsecondary writing situations. Students will write a variety of formal compositions (e.g., narrative/descriptive, persuasive, comparison/contrast, character description, etc.), compose resumes and business letters, and complete a research paper or project. Students will review the rules of English grammar and mechanics and apply these skills to the writing process. Vocabulary study will be a core component of the course. Literature (fiction and/or non-fiction) also will provide the basis for writing and compositions.


English 12: Academic

DOE: 1008

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

Academic English 12 is a rigorous class designed to prepare seniors for the academic workload expected at the college level. Required papers include a research paper and a variety of compositions such as narrative/descriptive, comparison/contrast, persuasive, and literary criticism. Students are expected to have a solid understanding of the basics of standard English usage and grammar before entry into the class. Advanced understanding of grammar, usage, mechanics, vocabulary and spelling is an integral part of the class. Vocabulary and spelling are emphasized.


English 12 Literature, Language, and Composition A/P

HHS Only

DOE: 1056

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: English 11 Honors, Registration by nomination and application only

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

This course is designed to prepare students for the national AP exams administered in May by the College Board. Selection is based upon self-nomination, verbal scores on standardized tests, English grades, and teacher recommendation. Course content consists of major British and American authors and works, from Shakespeare to contemporary writers. Weekly writing assignments focus on the critical analysis of literature and the types of writing covered in Academic English 12. Class work focuses on student presentation and analysis of works studied. Sample works include Hamlet, Heart of Darkness, Tess of the D’Urbervilles, and nine weeks of poetry. Frequent timed essays and sample objective exams are taken as practice for the AP exams, which are required of students in this class. These exams are given in the spring; costs may be as much as $92.


English 12 Literature and Composition A/P

MHS Only

DOE: 1058

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: English 11 Language and Composition A/P, Registration by application and nomination only

Course Fee: $3.00 per Semester

English Literature and Composition, Advanced Placement, is an advanced placement course based on content established by the College Board. An AP English course in Literature and Composition engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work's structure, style, and themes as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. The course includes intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods, concentrating on works of recognized literary merit. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html.

· Recommended Grade Level: Grades 11 and 12

· Credits: 2 credits, a two-semester course with 1 credit per semester

· Fulfills an English Language Arts requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors, Academic

Honors with Distinction, and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas


Themes in Literature

DOE: 1048

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Senior Level

Themes in Literature is designed for the General English student who wants to read literature arranged by themes such as struggle against intolerance, love, coping with death, and communion with nature. Students will read, analyze, and respond to various selections – short stories, poetry, drama, and nonfiction – from around the world. Two or three longer works will be read. Evaluation will be based on discussion, composition, vocabulary study, reading comprehension questions, tests, quizzes, and projects.


World Literature

DOE: 1052

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Senior Level

World Literature is a one-semester class designed for the General English student who wants to learn about different countries in the world through their literature. Students will read, analyze, and respond to various selections – short stories, poetry, non-fiction, two novels – along with learning about the geography and culture of the countries represented. Evaluation will be based upon discussion, composition, vocabulary study, reading comprehension questions, tests, quizzes, and projects involving research.


Novels

DOE: 1042

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Senior Level

Novels is a one-semester class designed for the Academic or General English student who wants to read full-length fiction. The course will focus on 20th century novels of different cultural backgrounds. Each semester the teacher will choose five to six culturally diverse novels from the list of titles available. Each unit will center on a novel and will include a major exam, project, and/or composition. Teachers will direct the students in activities that develop literary analysis skills, apply literary terms, explore the context and culture of the novels, and investigate the background of the author.


English Literature

DOE: 1030

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: A or B in Academic 11

This academic level course is intended for the serious English student. Similar to the American literature class taken during the junior year, this course is a survey of the historical and literary traditions of all genres of British literature from Beowulf to the present. Evaluation will be based upon analysis of the literature, discussion, synthesis of ideas, vocabulary, compositions, quizzes, and tests.


Classical Literature: Comparative Mythology

DOE: 1026

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Senior Level

This course is designed to acquaint students with (a) the creation and destruction myths of four major cultures (Babylonian, Egyptian, Hindu, Norse), and (b) heroic sagas from Babylonian, Indian, Norse, and Celtic mythologies. Other ancient mythologies may be incorporated at the discretion of the instructor. Students will be encouraged to understand myths as historical, cultural, and spiritual records as well as to appreciate them as aesthetic artifacts. Students will discover the unique elements of the specified mythologies as well as those patterns that bind one mythology to another. The course involves reading, essay writing, oral presentations, and projects.


English Electives

#denotes repeatable courses

Biblical Literature

DOE: 1022

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: None

Biblical Literature is an academic-level course designed to educate students on the literature of the Bible (both the Hebrew Bible, or Old Testament, and the New Testament) and its impact on culture, including literature, history, religion, politics, science, education, art, music, and cinema. In this course students will read (1) portions of the Bible as a primary text, (2) a textbook about the Bible and its impact, and (3) auxiliary texts including novels, short stories, poems and plays with biblical connections. In addition, students will listen to classical and contemporary/popular music, view art, and be exposed to other cultural expressions with biblical connections.


Etymology

DOE: 1060

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grade 10-12

(recommended for college bound students)

Etymology is a one-semester course designed to significantly improve the vocabulary of students through the study of Greek and Latin prefixes, roots and suffixes and words derived from these word elements. Instructional emphasis will include comprehension of new roots and new words, appreciation of good usage and precision in choosing the appropriate word for a specific purpose. In addition, this course provides a study of the connotative and denotative meaning of words in a variety of contexts. This course introduces students to tools and resources for etymological study and encourages them to be curious about the English language. This course is a valuable tool to prepare students for the SAT and for those students who might pursue a medical or legal career.


#Mass Media: Television I

DOE: 1084

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Pass Speech 10, Instructor Permission

Mass Media is an introduction to the world of news production and broadcasting. Students will learn the terminology and “how to” of the daily operation of a television studio by working at the many jobs available in broadcasting. McCutcheon HS concentrates on television production; Harrison HS approaches mass media from the perspective of radio, newspaper, and print as well as television.


Advanced Speech and Communication

DOE: 1078

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grades 10-12, Pass Speech I, Instructor Permission required

Advanced speech is an elective course designed to give students experience in competitive speaking: drama, humor, impromptu, extemporaneous speaking, literary interpretation, radio broadcasting, and oratory. Students will be required to compete in a minimum of two speech meets, which are held on Saturdays. (*Eligible for College Credit. Not for repeat)


#Debate

DOE: 1070

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grades 10-12, Pass Speech 10, Instructor Permission

Debate is designed to (1) introduce the fundamentals of argumentation, (2) enhance skills of research and citation, (3) provide students with experience in formal, competitive debate. Students will be required to compete in at least one Saturday debate meet.


#Creative Writing

DOE: 1092

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grades 10-12

Creative Writing is for students who like to write and who want to experiment with a variety of creative writing formats such as poetry, the short story, the personal essay, drama, and others. Students will practice techniques of writing, complete major writing assignments, and may keep a writer’s journal. Models of professional writing and examples of strong student writing will be analyzed.

Students will be expected to share their own writing with the group.


Advanced Composition

DOE: 1098

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisites: Grade 12, Pass Academic 12, Instructor Permission

This course is designed for students wishing to continue the development of their writing skills. The course will focus on both audience and purpose as prerequisites for skillful and successful completion of various writing projects. Students will develop a variety of topics from individual interest areas and will be guided to select appropriate modes of development for their topics.


Journalism

DOE: 1080

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Journalism students will learn the basics of journalistic writing: the 5 W’s and H, the lead paragraph, the key thought, and the inverted pyramid. Students will also study editorial cartoons, feature articles, news analysis, editorializing, interviewing techniques, headlines, and layout. At both Harrison and McCutcheon, students who wish to join the newspaper staff are required to take this journalism course first.


Dramatic Lit: Shakespeare

DOE: 1028

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grade 10-12, Permission of the Instructor

Students will have the opportunity to study 5-6 of Shakespeare’s greatest plays in depth. Students will read comedies, histories, and tragedies by the Bard. In addition to reading the plays, students can expect to complete writing, research, and project assignments and participate in classroom performances of the works studied.


Film Literature

DOE: 1034

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grades 11-12, Permission of the Instructor

Film Literature explores the history, techniques, and art of filmmaking in order to broaden students’ understanding of American culture and their definition of literacy. Additionally, students will do an in-depth examination and analysis of selected films from the silent era to the contemporary age, the course includes a chronological study of film techniques, technological developments, genres, styles, and eras.


#Genres of Literature: Independent Reading

DOE: 1036

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

This class is designed for all ability levels and grades. The teacher and student together will develop a reading profile. The student will select and read books tailored to his/her interests from a variety of genres. All reading will be directed reading with student input and will be reported on in some manner. Students must read one book from each of the four genres (fiction, drama, bio/autobiography, short story/poetry collection), post a written review for books read, and prepare each of the following at least once: a graphic representation, an oral presentation, and a paper of 500+ words in length.


English as a New Language

DOE: 1012

Credit/s: 1-4

Semester/s: 1-4

English as a New Language, an integrated English course based on Indiana's English Language Proficiency (ELP) Standards, is the study of language, literature, composition and oral communication for Limited English Proficient (LEP) students so that they improve proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, writing and comprehension of English. Students study English vocabulary used in fiction and content-area texts, speak and write English to function within a school setting and an English-speaking society, and deliver oral presentations appropriate to their respective levels of English proficiency.


Language Arts Lab

DOE: 1010

Credit/s: 1-8

Semester/s: 1-8

Language Arts Lab is a supplemental course that provides students with individualized or small group instruction designed to support success in completing language arts course work aligned with Indiana's Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grades 9 –12. This course is used with students in the Success Center.


Family and Consumer Sciences

Preparing for College and Careers

DOE: 5394

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Grade Levels: Required for 9th grade students

Course Fee: $5.00

This is a required course for freshmen providing skills necessary for successful job/career decision-making. This course addresses the essential knowledge, skills, and behaviors all students need to live successfully in today's world. The focus of the course is on the impact of today's choices on tomorrow's possibilities. Project based topics to be addressed include higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes; exploration of planning for the future; planning and building employability skills including the development of a portfolio and a job shadowing experience; transferring school skills to life and work; decision- making and organizational skills including the development of a four year Career/Educational Plan; and managing personal resources.

If participating in the Vincennes University Early College program this course will provide credit for completion. SSKL 103


Child Development

DOE: 5362

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

This course addresses the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors associated with supporting and promoting optimal growth and development of infants and children. The focus is on research-based nurturing and parenting practices and skills that support positive development of children. Topics include consideration of the roles, responsibilities and challenges of parenthood; adolescent pregnancy; human sexuality; prenatal development; preparation for birth; the birth process; meeting the physical, social, emotional, intellectual, moral, and cultural growth and developmental needs of infants and children up to age 3; impacts of heredity, environment, and family and societal crisis on the development of the child; meeting children's needs for food, clothing, shelter, and caregiving; caring for children with special needs; parental resources, services, and agencies; and career awareness. Successful completion of both Child Development and Advanced Child Development are necessary to qualify for Early Childhood Education.


Advanced Child Development

DOE: 5360

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: PCC, Child Development, or Instructor Permission

This course addresses more complex issues of childcare and development, emphasizing guiding physical, intellectual, social, psychological, cultural, and moral development throughout childhood, including school age children. Topics addressed include positive parenting and nurturing across ages and stages; developmentally appropriate guidance and intervention strategies with individuals and groups of children; accessing, evaluating, and utilizing information, including brain/learning research and other research results; exploration of all aspects of the child care and development industry. Successful completion of Child Development, Advanced Child Development, and Early Childhood Education classes are necessary to qualify for Early Childhood Education.


Human Development and Wellness: Family Issues

DOE: 5366

Credit/s: 1-2

Semester/s: 1-2

Prerequisite/s: Interpersonal Relationships

Grade Levels: Suggested for 10th grade and up

Human Development and Family Wellness addresses development and wellness of individuals and families throughout the life cycle. One semester focuses on the family. Topics include human development and wellness theories, principles and practices; roles, responsibilities, and functions of families and family members throughout the life cycle; individual and family wellness planning; prevention and management of illnesses and disease; impacts of diverse perspectives, needs, and characteristics on human development and family wellness; gerontology and intergenerational aspects including adult caregiving; contemporary family issues, including ethics, human worth and dignity, change, stress, and family crisis-abuse-violence; physical, mental and emotional health services, including substance use/abuse and eating disorders; managing the family's health-related resources; community services; agencies and resources; and exploration of human and family services careers.


Human Development and Wellness: Fitness and Nutrition

DOE: 5366

Credit/s: 1/semester

Semester/s: 1-2

Grade Levels: 10th grade and up

Human Development and Family Wellness addresses development and wellness of individuals and families throughout the life cycle. One semester centers on Fitness and Nutrition that provides information about combining exercise and eating habits to reach a desired physical fitness level and wellness. Areas of study include wellness self-assessment, study of nutrients, eating patterns, principles of weight control, and pre-competition meals.


Nutrition & Wellness

DOE: 5342

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: None

Course Fee: $20.00

Nutrition and Wellness enables students to realize the components and lifelong benefits of good nutrition and wellness and empowers them to apply these principles in their everyday lives. Topics include impact of daily nutrition and wellness practices on long-term health and wellness; physical, social, and psychological aspects of healthy nutrition and wellness choices; selection and preparation of nutritious meals and snacks based on USDA Dietary Guidelines including My Plate; safety, sanitation, storage, and recycling processes and issues associated with nutrition and wellness; impacts of science and technology on nutrition and wellness issues; and career paths within nutrition and wellness. Laboratory experiences which emphasize both nutrition and wellness.


Advanced Nutrition and Wellness

DOE: 5340

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Nutrition and Wellness, Instructor permission. Grade Levels: Suggested for 10th grade and up

Course Fee: $35.00

Emphases that may be addressed are contemporary economic, social, psychological, cultural, and global issues, including hunger, technology of foods, tools, and equipment--past, present, and future; acquiring, organizing, and evaluating information about foods and nutrition, including via the Internet; nutrition and meal planning for special needs; exploration of all aspects of the food industry; experimentation and specialty or advanced or gourmet preparation skills.


Introduction to Housing and Interior Design

DOE: 5350

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Course Fee: $10.00

Housing and Interiors addresses selecting and planning living environments to meet the needs and wants of individuals and families throughout the family life cycle, considering a broad range of economic, social, cultural, technological, environmental, maintenance, and aesthetic factors. Topics addressed include elements and principles of design related to interiors, housing, and architecture; blueprinting and floor planning skills; creating functional, safe and aesthetically pleasing spaces; environmental and energy issues; impacts of technology; housing to meet special needs; furniture and appliances, including historical aspects and contemporary trends; kitchen design; evaluating housing styles, locations, zones, restrictions, and ownership options; managing resources to provide shelter for individuals and families, including financing options, tax consideration; contemporary housing issues, including homelessness; exploration of housing/interior-related careers.


Housing and Interior Careers I & II

DOE: 5352 & 5460

Credit/s: 1 or 2

Semester/s: 1 or 2

Prerequisite/s: Introduction to Housing and Interior Design. Grade Levels 10,11 or 12

Course Fee: $20.00/semester

The field of Interior Design encompasses a unique blend of art and science. The goal of this course is to assist the student in understanding and achieving the designer's goal. This goal is to analyze the needs and desires of the client, and then through synthesis of the information, create a healthful and safe environment that enhances the quality of life for the client. The course topics include the profession of Interior Design, historical influences on careers related to interior design, design fundamentals, building systems, residential and commercial space planning, furnishings, fabrics, background elements, architecture, furniture and accessories, and exploration of current technologies being used in the Interior Design Field.


Adult Roles & Responsibilities

DOE: 5330

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grades 11-12

This course builds knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors students will need to take the next steps toward adulthood in today's changing society. A project-based approach that utilizes high order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes integrates topics into the study of individual and family issues. The focus is on becoming independent, contributing, and responsible participants in family, community, and career settings. Topics include living independently; analysis of personal standards, needs, aptitudes and goals; integration of family, community and career responsibilities; consumer choices and decision making related to nutrition and wellness, clothing, housing and transportation; financial management; relationship of technology and environmental issues to family and consumer resources; and community roles and responsibilities.


Interpersonal Relationships

DOE: 5364

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

This course addresses the knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors all students need to participate in positive, caring, and respectful relationships in the family and with individuals in school, the community, and the workplace. Topics include components of healthy relationships, roles and responsibilities in relationships; functions and expectations of relationships; ethics in relationships; factors that impact relationships (e.g., power, conflicting interests, peer pressure, life events); establishing and maintaining relationships; building self-esteem and self-image through healthy relationships; communications styles; techniques for effective communication, leadership and teamwork; individual and group goals, and decision making; preventing and managing stress and conflict; addressing violence and abuse; and related resources.

Introduction to Fashion and Textiles

DOE: 5380

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Course Fee: $20.00

Fashion and Textiles Foundations addresses knowledge and skills related to design, production, acquisition, and distribution in the textiles and fashions arenas. Topics that may be addressed include exploration of the textiles and fashion industries; elements of science and design in apparel and textiles; textiles principles and applications; social, psychological, and environmental aspects of clothing and textiles selection; clothing for people with special needs; critical thinking applied to consumer options for fashion, textiles, and related equipment and tools; care and maintenance of textile products, equipment and tools; technology; construction and alterations skills; contemporary as well as global issues.


Fashion and Textiles Careers 1 & 2

DOE: 5420 (FTC1) & DOE: 5421 (FTC2)

Credit/s: 1 or 2

Semester/s: 1 or 2

Prerequisite/s: Introduction to Fashion & Textiles & Grade 10,11 and 12

Course Fee: $30.00/semester

The Fashion Industry is a complex and exciting world. The course exposes students to the many facets of the fashion industry and introduces them to the real world of fashion. This course includes information and ideas about textile production and design, fashion development and research, textile marketing and merchandising, garment and accessory design, marketing and merchandising, retail marketing and merchandising, and explores current design technologies being used in the fashion industry. The processes that fashion undergoes to get from concept to consumer are analyzed and discussed.


Early Childhood Education I & II

DOE: 5412 (ECEI) & DOE: 5406 (ECEII)

Credit/s: 1-3 per semester, 6 dual credits upon completion of both courses (HHS Only)

Semester/s: 2-this is a full year course

Prerequisite/s: Grades 11-12, Child Development and Advanced Child Development. Permission of instructor may be required.

Early Childhood Education I, II prepares students for employment in early childhood education and services and provides the foundations for study in higher education that leads to child-related careers. The course of study includes, but is not limited to, Indiana State child care regulations; planning and guiding developmentally appropriate activities for young children; developmentally appropriate practices of guidance and discipline; application of basic health and safety principles when working with children; overview of management and operation of child care facilities; and employability skills. Students will work in the childcare lab one or two class periods and will be in the related class one period.


Introduction to Culinary Arts and Hospitality

DOE: 5438

Credit/s: 1 per Semester

Semester/s: 1 or 2

Prerequisite/s: Nutrition & Wellness

Course Fee: $25.00/semester

This course is for students considering a career related to culinary arts, food or nutrition. Topics: safety, sanitation, storage and recycling processes in the industry; impacts of science and technology on the industry; and culinary arts career pathways. Students will explore the industry in depth and examine their own career goals in light of their findings. Laboratory experiences emphasizing industry practices and development of basic industry skills are required components of this course. This course is recommended for any students to build basic culinary arts knowledge and skills. This course is recommended as a core component of the four-year career plans for the career clusters of agriculture, food and natural resources; science, engineering and information technology; education and training; and personal and commercial services.


Education Professions I

DOE: 5408

Credit/s: 1-3 per Semester

Semester/s: 1 or 2

Prerequisite/s: None

This course provides the foundation for employment in education and related careers and prepares students for study in higher education. An active learning approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate suggested topics into the study of education and related careers. The course of study includes, but is not limited to: the teaching profession, the learner and the learning process, planning instruction, learning environment, and instructional and assessment strategies. Exploratory field experiences in classroom settings and career portfolios are required components. A standards-based plan guides the students’ field experiences. Students are monitored in their field experiences by the Education Professionals I teacher. Articulation with postsecondary programs is encouraged.


Education Professions II

DOE: 5404

Credit/s: 1 per Semester

Semester/s: 1 or 2

Prerequisites/s: Education Professions I and Instructor Approval

This course prepares students for employment in education and related careers and provides the foundation for study in higher education in these career areas. An active learning approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate suggested topics into the study of education and related careers. The course of study includes, but is not limited to: the teaching profession, the learner and the learning process, planning instruction, learning environment, and instructional and assessment strategies. Extensive field experiences in one or more classroom settings, resumes, and career portfolios are required components. A standards-based plan guides the students’ field experiences. Students are monitored in their field experiences by the Education Professions II teacher. Articulation with postsecondary programs is encouraged.


Fine Arts

Introduction to Two Dimensional Art (L)

DOE: 4000

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Course Fee: $30.00

During this course, students will explore the basic elements and principles of 2-D art. Students will work with a wide variety of media, learn about several artists and their styles, and/or participate in critiques in order to understand the importance of the elements and principles. Students will express themselves through drawing, design, painting, and/or printmaking.


Drawing: I (L)

DOE: 4060

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Into. to 2-D Art

Course Fee: $35.00

During this course, students will continue applying their previously-acquired knowledge of the elements and principles of 2-D art within their work. Students will also continue to work with a wide variety of media, learn about several artists and their styles, and/or participate in critiques. Students will express themselves through a variety of types of drawing, including sketching, gesture, contour, still-life, landscapes, portraiture, scratchboard, perspective, and/or illustration.


Drawing: II (L)

DOE: 4060

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Drawing I

Course Fee: $35.00

This course is for students who wish to further develop strong drawing skills as well as personal technique and imagery. Students will continue to work with a wide variety of media to express themselves through a variety of types of drawing.


Advanced Two Dimensional Art: Drawing III

DOE: 4004

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Drawing II

Course Fee: $35.00

This course is for students who wish to further develop strong drawing skills as well as personal technique and imagery. Students will continue to work with a wide variety of media to express themselves through a variety of types of drawing.


Advanced Two Dimensional Art: Drawing IV

DOE: 4004

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Drawing III

Course Fee: $35.00

This course is for students who wish to further develop strong drawing skills as well as personal technique and imagery. Students will continue to work with a wide variety of media to express themselves through a variety of types of drawing.


Painting: I (L)

DOE: 4064

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Intro. to 2-D, (Drawing I at HHS ONLY)

Course Fee: $35.00

During this course, students will depend on their previously-acquired drawing skills to create successful paintings. Students will work with a variety of paint, including acrylic, ink, oil, paintstiks, tempera, and/or watercolor. Students will learn about several artists and their styles and/or participate in critiques. Students will express themselves through a variety of painting processes and techniques.


Painting: II (L)

DOE: 4064

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Painting I

Course Fee: $35.00

This course is for students who wish to further develop strong painting skills as well as personal technique and imagery. Students will continue to work with a variety of paints to express themselves in their own style.


Advanced Two Dimensional Art: Painting III

DOE: 4004

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Painting II

Course Fee: $35.00

This course is for students who wish to further develop strong painting skills as well as personal technique and imagery. Students will continue to work with a variety of paints to express themselves in their own style.


Advanced Two Dimensional Art: Painting IV

DOE: 4004

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Painting III

Course Fee: $35.00

This course is for students who wish to further develop strong painting skills as well as personal technique and imagery. Students will continue to work with a variety of paints to express themselves in their own style.


Digital Photography: I (L)

DOE: 4062

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Students must have their own digital camera

Course Fee: $30.00

During this course, students will explore the elements of art and principles of design as they relate to photographic composition, the parts and functions of the digital camera, digital darkroom techniques, the history of photography, and a variety of methods, techniques, and processes used in producing images. They will also make and print photographs based on various thematic assignments.


Digital Photography: II (L)

DOE: 4062

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Digital Photography I & Students must have their own digital camera

Course Fee: $30.00

During this course, students will improve and develop their digital photography skills, demonstrate the use of editing software programs and printers, and compose and produce well-crafted digital images. They will also be encouraged to create projects that yield individual creativity and personal interpretation in their image-making. Students will participate in critiques of their own and their peers’ work.


Digital Photography: III (L)

DOE: 4062

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Digital Photo II & Students must have their own digital camera

Course Fee: $30.00

This is an advanced class requiring students to work independently and collaboratively to create artistic photographic images. Their digital imaging will reflect an emphasis on the aesthetic, technical, and critical-thinking skills necessary throughout the process. Students will also participate in critiques, discussions, and written reflections about their images.


Digital Photography: IV (L)

DOE: 4062

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Photography III & Students must have their own digital camera

Course Fee: $30.00

This course involves the application of photographic knowledge on an individual basis. Photography IV begins with a review of areas studied in previous semesters and expands on the in-depth knowledge of photography already gained.


Digital Photography: V (L)

DOE: 4062

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Photography IV & Students must have their own digital camera

Course Fee: $50.00

This course involves the application of photographic knowledge on an individual basis. The course begins with a review and expands in-depth knowledge of photography already gained. Some assignments are related to careers in art, which emphasize photography. This course is also geared to the presentation of portfolio and to independent work.


Digital Photography: VI (L)

DOE: 4062

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Photography V & Students must have their own digital camera

Course Fee: $50.00

This course involves the application of photographic knowledge on an individual basis. This course begins with a review of areas studied in previous semesters and expands on the in-depth knowledge of photography gained already. Some assignments are related to careers in art, which emphasize photography. This course is also geared to the presentation of a portfolio and to independent work.


Advanced Two Dimensional Art or Advanced Three Dimensional Art (Independent Study)

DOE: 4004 or 4006

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: See course description

Course Fee: $60.00

In order for any student to be placed in this type of study, they must first meet the requirements set forth by the instructor. The student must have a “B’ average in past art classes; be able to work independently; and have permission from the instructor. Students must maintain a passing grade after the first nine weeks of the semester to continue Independent Study.

Studio Art Advanced (L)

DOE: 4048, 4050 or 4052

Credit/s: 1-2

Semester/s: 1-2

Prerequisite/s: Must earn an A or B in a minimum of two Art classes and receive teacher recommendation

Course Fee: $60.00 per Semester

This course is for the serious Art student who is interested in portfolio development for college credit. Units in all media will be opened to advanced students and development of individuality in thought as well as technique will be encouraged through teacher- guided independent study. Only students who have demonstrated self-motivation, discipline, and a desire to expand their knowledge of art will be considered for this class. The student will also participate in self and group evaluation throughout the course and submit work to various local, state and national competitions.

Studio Art (Portfolio) – Semester 1: Students spend this semester creating pieces of artwork that reflect their chosen concentration (theme) and media. They will be required to document their work in photographic and written form. Students will participate in critiques to not only get feedback but inspiration as they continue within their concentration.

Studio Art (AP Art) – Semester 2: Students spend this semester refining and completing their twenty-four high quality portfolio pieces that will be submitted for evaluation. They will participate in teacher and group critiques as they finalize their portfolio. All portfolio pieces must include written documentation, be photographed, organized, and digitally uploaded for submission in college credit.

*Disclaimer: Students who take Studio Art (Portfolio) are not required to continue with AP Art if there are scheduling conflicts.


Introduction to Three Dimensional Art (L)

DOE: 4002

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: None

Course Fee: $35.00

During this course, students will explore the basic elements and principles of 3-D art. Students will work with a variety of media, learn about several artists and their styles, and/or participate in critiques in order to understand the importance and good use of the elements and principles in their work. Students will be encouraged to express themselves through sculpture, ceramics, and/or fiber design.


Ceramics: I (L)

DOE: 4040

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Intro. to 3-D Art

Course Fee: $35.00

This course is designed as a studio workshop in which students will explore ceramics as a three-dimensional medium. Clay experiences will include a variety of hand-built and/or wheel thrown techniques. Students will learn by combining creativity with technical mastery, personal statement and functional capability.


Ceramics: II (L)

DOE: 4040

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Ceramics I

Course Fee: $35.00

Students will gain further development in hand-building and wheel skills. They will have an introduction to different types of clay bodies, glazes, and alternative firing techniques. Students will have an opportunity to pursue the sculptural techniques in ceramics.


Ceramics: III (L)

DOE: 4040

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Ceramics II

Course Fee: $35.00

During this course, students will gain further development in hand-building and wheel skills. Hand-building techniques will also include sculpting with various clay bodies. There will be continued experimentation with decorative and glazing techniques.


Ceramics: IV (L)

DOE: 4040

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Ceramics III

Course Fee: $35.00

Students will continue mastering specific skills on the wheel, and exploring building techniques, glaze composition, and further developing one’s own style.


Ceramics: V (L)

DOE: 4040

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Ceramics IV

Course Fee: $35.00

During this course, students will continue mastering specific, increasingly difficult skills on the wheel and exploring building techniques, glaze composition, and further developing one’s own style.


Ceramics: VI (L)

DOE: 4040

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Ceramics V

Course Fee: $35.00

This class is designed to accommodate the serious ceramic artist. It will allow students to continue to develop skills as well as pursue in-depth exploration into creativity through the medium of clay.


Fiber Arts (L)

DOE: 4046

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Intro. to 3-D Art

Course Fee: $35.00

During this course, students will explore various fiber arts materials and techniques. They will build on the knowledge and skills developed in Introduction to 3-D Art and continue to emphasize the elements and principles of art in their fiber-related pieces. Some processes that may be explored are basketry, weaving, fabric design, mixed media and/or papermaking. Students will also explore a variety of cultures and the processes that the people of those cultures engage in. Students will develop vocabulary specific to the discipline of fibers, including appropriate terminology for equipment, materials, and processes.


Fiber Arts: II (L)

DOE: 4046

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Fiber Arts I

Course Fee: $40.00

This course is for students who wish to further explore a variety of fiber arts materials and techniques. They will continue to explore a variety of processes, cultures, and the process that the people of those cultures engage in. Students will also continue to develop vocabulary specific to the discipline of fiber arts.


Fiber Arts: III (L)

DOE: 4046

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Fiber Arts II

Course Fee: $40.00

This course is for students who wish to complete an intensive study in fibers. It is a studio class, which emphasizes the creation of a body of work along with an artist’s statement to be included within their portfolios. Permission from the instructor will be required for admission into the course. Students will be expected to explore one or more process(es) and/or technique(s) learned in previous classes.


Sculpture: I (L)

DOE: 4044

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Intro. to 3-D Art (and Ceramics I at HHS Only)

Course Fee: $35.00

During this course, students will build on the knowledge and skills developed in Introduction to 3-D Art. They will continue to emphasize the elements and principles of art in their sculptures. Students will construct realistic and abstract sculptures using additive, subtractive, modeling, and mixed media methods with a variety of materials. They will also explore a variety of cultures and the processes that the people of those cultures engage in. Students will develop vocabulary specific to the discipline of sculpture.


Sculpture: II (L)

DOE: 4044

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Sculpture I

Course Fee: $35.00

During this course, students will continue to emphasize the elements and principles of art in their sculptures. Students will construct realistic and abstract sculptures using additive, subtractive, modeling and mixed media methods with a variety of materials. They will continue to explore a variety of cultures and the processes that the people of those cultures engage in, while continuing to develop vocabulary specific to the discipline of sculpture.


Visual Communication

DOE: 4086

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Intro. to 2-D Art

During this course, students will learn varied approaches to digital drawing and painting. The course will focus on developing a thorough understanding of digital art software in order to create successful realistic as well as creative imagery. Students will apply their understanding of the elements of art and principles of design to develop strong compositions. Students will investigate how images can influence ideas and feelings and will work to create original, meaningful concepts for digital drawings and paintings. The history of digital art forms and how artists are utilizing these tools and concepts in the illustration and animation workplace will be studied.


Music Theory and Composition, A/P

DOE: 4210

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Recommended Grades: 10, 11 & 12

This is based on the content established by the College Board. Music Theory is intended for secondary school students who have completed music studies comparable to a first-year college course in music theory. The guidelines for the course that are published by The College Board may not match any particular college program, but they do reflect the coverage of content and level of skills typical of most first-year college courses. This course should integrate aspects of melody, harmony, texture, rhythm, form, musical analysis, elementary composition, and history, and style. The student‘s ability to read and write musical notation is fundamental to this course, and it is also assumed that the student has acquired at least basic performance skills in voice or on an instrument. It fulfills a requirement for two Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors Diploma and also fulfills the requirement as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.


Beginning Chorus (L)

DOE: 4182

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: None

NOTE: Chorus: Beginning (Participation outside of school is required)

Beginning Chorus is designed to develop students’ musicianship and specific performance skills, which include posture, tone production, breathing and vocal techniques, and intonation through ensemble and solo literature. Activities and experiences will include sequential and systematic instruction in music reading, critical listening skills, and the development of a quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature appropriate in difficulty and range for the ability of the ensemble. Students will increase their aural and analytical skills through identifying the basic elements of music including melody, harmony, rhythm, timbre, texture, form, and style of the literature studies in class. Preparation for the performance of a wide variety of literature will include the study of the historical, formal, analytical, and stylistic elements of each composition performed.

Activities and experiences may include male chorus, female chorus, or mixed chorus, and will be designed to develop students’ abilities to listen, analyze, and sight sing using systematic and progressive means; make interpretive decisions; conduct; and improvise. The development of students’ artistic and aesthetic perception will be of primary importance. This course allows for successive semesters of instruction.


Beginning Chorus: Female (L)

HHS Only

DOE: 4182

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: None

NOTE: Chorus: Beginning (Participation outside of school is required)

Beginning Chorus is designed to develop students’ musicianship and specific performance skills, which include posture, tone production, breathing and vocal techniques, and intonation through ensemble and solo literature. Activities and experiences will include sequential and systematic instruction in music reading, critical listening skills, and the development of a quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature appropriate in difficulty and range for the ability of the ensemble. Students will increase their aural and analytical skills through identifying the basic elements of music including melody, harmony, rhythm, timbre, texture, form, and style of the literature studies in class. Preparation for the performance of a wide variety of literature will include the study of the historical, formal, analytical, and stylistic elements of each composition performed.

Activities and experiences may include male chorus, female chorus, or mixed chorus, and will be designed to develop students’ abilities to listen, analyze, and sight sing using systematic and progressive means; make interpretive decisions; conduct; and improvise. The development of students’ artistic and aesthetic perception will be of primary importance. This course allows for successive semesters of instruction.


Beginning Chorus: Men (L)

HHS Only

DOE: 4182

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: None

NOTE: Chorus: Beginning (Participation outside of school is required)

Beginning Chorus is designed to develop students’ musicianship and specific performance skills, which include posture, tone production, breathing and vocal techniques, and intonation through ensemble and solo literature. Activities and experiences will include sequential and systematic instruction in music reading, critical listening skills, and the development of a quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature appropriate in difficulty and range for the ability of the ensemble. Students will increase their aural and analytical skills through identifying the basic elements of music including melody, harmony, rhythm, timbre, texture, form, and style of the literature studies in class. Preparation for the performance of a wide variety of literature will include the study of the historical, formal, analytical, and stylistic elements of each composition performed.

Activities and experiences may include male chorus, female chorus, or mixed chorus, and will be designed to develop students’ abilities to listen, analyze, and sight sing using systematic and progressive means; make interpretive decisions; conduct; and improvise. The development of students’ artistic and aesthetic perception will be of primary importance. This course allows for successive semesters of instruction.


Intermediate Chorus (L)

DOE: 4186

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: None

NOTE: Chorus: Intermediate (Participation outside of school is required)

Intermediate Chorus is designed to develop students’ musicianship and specific performance skills, which include posture, tone production, breathing and vocal techniques, and intonation through ensemble and solo literature. Activities and experiences will include sequential and systematic instruction in music reading, critical listening skills, and the development of a quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature appropriate in difficulty and range for the ability of the ensemble. Students will increase their aural and analytical skills through identifying the basic elements of music including melody, harmony, rhythm, timbre, texture, form, and style of the literature studies in class. Preparation for the performance of a wide variety of literature will include the study of the historical, formal, analytical, and stylistic elements of each composition performed.

Activities and experiences may include male chorus, female chorus, or mixed chorus, and will be designed to develop students’ abilities to listen, analyze, and sight sing using systematic and progressive means; make interpretive decisions; conduct; and improvise. The development of students’ artistic and aesthetic perception will be of primary importance. This course allows for successive semesters of instruction.


Advanced Chorus (L)

DOE: 4188

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s:

MHS-Permission of the Instructor

HHS-Permission of the Instructor. Membership is open to advanced instrumentalists who have auditioned for the director and have been assigned to this course.

NOTE: Chorus: Advanced (Participation outside of school is required)

Advanced Chorus is designed to develop students’ musicianship and specific performance skills, which include posture, tone production, breathing and vocal techniques, and intonation through ensemble and solo literature. Activities and experiences will include sequential and systematic instruction in music reading, critical listening skills, and the development of a quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature appropriate in difficulty and range for the ability of the ensemble. Students will increase their aural and analytical skills through identifying the basic elements of music including melody, harmony, rhythm, timbre, texture, form, and style of the literature studies in class. Preparation for the performance of a wide variety of literature will include the study of the historical, formal, analytical, and stylistic elements of each composition performed.

Activities and experiences may include male chorus, female chorus, or mixed chorus, and will be designed to develop students’ abilities to listen, analyze, and sight sing using systematic and progressive means; make interpretive decisions; conduct; and improvise. The development of students’ artistic and aesthetic perception will be of primary importance. This course allows for successive semesters of instruction.

Choral Chamber Ensemble (L)

DOE: 4180

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s:

MHS-Permission of the Instructor

HHS-Permission of the Instructor. Membership is open to advanced instrumentalists who have auditioned for the director and been assigned to this course.

NOTE: Chorus: Choral Chamber Ensemble (Participation outside of school is required)

Choral Chamber Ensemble will provide sequential and systematic learning activities and include small group and individual instruction designed to develop the skills necessary to perform a widely varied repertoire of ensemble and solo literature. Activities and experiences will develop students’ abilities to sight read; listen to, analyze, and study the literature performed; study elements of music in a wide variety of contexts; improvise; perform in a variety of small ensembles; and make interpretive decisions. Preparation for the performance of a wide variety of literature will include the study of the historical, formal, analytical, and stylistic elements of each composition performed.

The development of students’ artistic and aesthetic perception will be of primary importance. The nature of this course can allow for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level.


Vocal Jazz (L)

DOE: 4184

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s:

MHS-Permission of the Instructor

HHS-Permission of the Instructor. Membership is open to advanced instrumentalists who have auditioned for the director and been assigned to this course.

NOTE: Chorus: Vocal Jazz (Participation outside of school is required)

Vocal Jazz classes provides sequential and systematic instruction in large group, small group, and individualized settings for the study and performance of the wide idiomatic popular styles that comprise the field of vocal jazz music. These styles will include blues forms, swing, bebop, rock, and fusion. Students will develop specific performance skills, which include tone production, vocal techniques, intonation, music reading skills, and appropriate stylistic performance techniques. Students will increase their creative skills through improvisation, composition, and arranging. A significant portion of the course will be devoted to the study of the historical, formative, and stylistic elements of jazz, with emphasis on connecting the historical development of the vocal jazz idiom with structured listening to representative performances of the music studied. The nature of this course can allow for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level.


Beginning Concert Band (L)

DOE: 4160

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Permission of Instructor

Course Fee: $12.00

NOTE: Band: Beginning Concert Band (Participation outside of school is required)

Beginning Concert Band is designed to provide sequential and systematic learning activities through instrumental music. Activities and experiences are designed to develop the students’ abilities to: listen, analyze, interpret, sight read, and study the literature performed. Many opportunities are given for the development of student self-expression through numerous public performances.


Intermediate Concert Band (L)

DOE: 4168

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Permission of Instructor: Membership is open to instrumentalists who have been enrolled in the Beginning Concert Band one year or have auditioned for the director

Course Fee: $12.00

NOTE: Band: Intermediate Concert Band (Participation outside of school is required)

Intermediate Concert Band is designed to provide sequential and systematic learning activities through instrumental music. Activities and experiences are designed to develop the students’ abilities to: listen, analyze, interpret, sight-read, and study the literature performed. Many opportunities are given for the development of student self-expression through numerous public performances.


Advanced Concert Band (L)

DOE: 4170

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Permission of Instructor. Membership is open to advanced instrumentalists who have auditioned for the director and been assigned to this course.

Course Fee: $12.00

NOTE: Band: Advanced Concert Band (Participation outside of school is required)

Students in this organization are required to participate extensively in all phases of the program and are encouraged to study privately. Advanced Concert Band is designed to provide sequential and systematic learning activities through advanced instrumental music. Activities and experiences are designed to develop the students’ abilities to: listen, analyze, interpret, sight read, and study the advanced literature performed. Many opportunities are given for the development of student self-expression through numerous public performances.


Jazz Ensemble (L)

DOE: 4164

Credits: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Instructor Permission: By audition only.

NOTE: Band: Jazz Ensemble (Participation outside of school is required) There is NO course fee for this class.

Membership is open to advanced players in the standard Big Band instrumentation and is limited to five trumpets, five trombones/baritones, two alto saxes, two tenor saxes, one baritone sax, guitar, bass, piano, and drum set. Instruction includes the study of the history, formative, and stylistic elements of jazz. Students develop their creative skills through improvisation, composition, arranging, performing, listening, and analyzing. All instrumentalists must be concurrently enrolled in another band. Students in this organization are required to participate extensively in all aspects of the program and are encouraged to study privately.


Music Theory and Composition (L)

DOE: 4208

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Demonstration of Basic Music Skills

NOTE: There is NO course fee for this class.

Music Theory and Composition is the study of musical composition skills, form, harmony, chords, notation, scales, and other elements of music. As the class progresses, four-part harmony and music composition skills are explored.


Piano and Electronic Keyboard (L)

DOE: 4204

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Permission of the Instructor

Course Fee: $12.00

Piano lab is an opportunity for any student to enhance their ability on the piano. This course is available to students with no prior experience or who may be accomplished pianists. Students will learn the basics of notation, note names, counting, and musical expression. This lab is an opportunity for all students and may be repeated for credit.


Theatre Arts (L)

DOE: 4242

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grades 9-12. Average of C or above in General, Academic, or Honors English, or the permission of instructor.

Students explore the world of drama: performing, directing, costuming, makeup, publicity, and set design. This is a “hands on” class in which students are expected to participate actively. Students will experience all aspects of a theatrical production from performance to “back stage” technical elements.


Advanced Theatre Arts (L)

DOE: 4240

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grade “C” or better in Theatre Arts

Course Fee: $12.00

This is a one-semester performance based class that allows students to apply in depth the elements of physical, vocal and imaginative expression introduced in Theatre Arts I and examines dramatic arts over time and across cultures. Script analysis, styles of acting, in-depth characterization, and emphasis on stagecraft will also be covered. Scene performance is an integral part of this course. Intensifying the application of these skills will help the student increase awareness of professional, community, and high school theatre operations. This will improve individual talent, confidence, knowledge, and understanding of both the technical and performance sides of theatre.


Theatre Production (L)

DOE: 4248

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Theatre Production is for students who want to participate in a full-scale musical production. Students can participate in the performance, technical, and/or business aspects of theatre. This course can be repeated for credit.


Technical Theatre (L)

DOE: 4244

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

This course is an elective for students who wish to learn more about the theories of design and stagecraft with the construction and operation of the various elements of technical theatre. Students are provided with opportunities to: 1) develop stage craft skills; 2) learn various techniques in scenery, lighting, sound, properties, costumes, and makeup; 3) practice theatre safety; and 4) learn effective stage management, business plans, and promotional techniques. Students are made aware of career opportunities in technical theatre. They also continue to analyze and evaluate scripts and live theatre performances so that they learn to determine appropriate technical requirements for a variety of theatrical works. Selection of individual units will be left to the discretion of the instructor. This course can be repeated for credit.


Student Publications (Newspaper Production)

DOE: 1086

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Admission is by application or permission of the instructor; at both Harrison and McCutcheon, a student wishing to be on the newspaper staff must have taken Non-Production Journalism, DOE 1080.

Newspaper production gives students a “hands-on” experience in journalism. Part of the course will be spent learning the fundamentals of newspaper production, and much of the course will involve producing the school newspaper. Extensive writing, proofreading, and editing will be required. Students interested in journalistic photography will also be welcome. Students will be required to sell advertisements to finance the publication.


#Student Publication (Yearbook Production)

DOE: 1086

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Admission is by application and permission of the instructor

Yearbook is designed to give students a “hands-on” experience in journalism. Part of the course will be spent learning the fundamentals of yearbook production, which include page design, photography, copy, and caption writing. Much of the course will involve producing the school yearbook. Students will be required to sell advertisements, sell yearbook subscriptions, and participate in fundraisers to finance the publication.


Health and Physical Education

Physical Education I: Sport Education (L)

DOE: 3542

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

The required course meets the state standards through a variety of activities, including: team sports; individual and dual activities; outdoor pursuits; aquatics; rhythm and fitness; within the framework of lifetime physical activities and fitness. Throughout the semester, the students will integrate knowledge of health and skill related fitness as it is sometimes achieved through sport. Students will gain knowledge of the value of sport in their personal life and society. This course is required for Academic Honors Diploma. This course may be adapted to meet those needs of students with disabilities.


Physical Education II: Wellness Education (L)

DOE: 3544

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

This course is designed to promote health and skill related fitness, and the knowledge of the role they play in maintaining a healthy lifestyle, to live an active life, and prevent certain health related disorders. Students will be assessed in the components of health related fitness and will learn how to set appropriate goals for a personal fitness plan. The course include a classroom component to gain knowledge in the application and principles of training. Fitness activities, including but not limited to, weight training, circuits, aerobic activities, yoga, calisthenics, fitness trends, games, sports and aquatic workouts will be included that improve the following health related fitness components: cardiovascular endurance, flexibility, body composition, muscular strength and muscular endurance. The components of skill related fitness, including agility, balance, coordination, power, reaction time and speed will be addressed in some of the activities throughout this course. This course may be adapted to meet those needs of students with disabilities.


Elective Physical Education: Team (L)

DOE: 3560

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: PE I and II

This class can be taken only after the required courses are completed. This course will be team sport oriented and will include: aquatics, basketball, cricket, flag football, floor hockey, lacrosse, rugby, sharbade, soccer, softball, speedball, ultimate, volleyball, flickerball, team handball, and water polo. Emphasis is on developing a higher skill level within each activity, as well as an increased knowledge of officiating, as well as offensive and defensive strategies.


Elective Physical Education: Individual (L)

DOE: 3560

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: PE I and II

This class can be taken only after the required courses are completed. This course is focused on individual, dual and lifetime activities and will include, but not limited to: archery, badminton, bowling, golf, pickleball, shuffleboard, table tennis, tennis, and weight training. The course will include deeper appreciation for each activity through outside resources, officiating, and reports on activities. Individual and lifetime sports will be emphasized.


Elective Physical Education: Conditioning (L)

DOE: 3560

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

In this conditioning class the students will learn to assess their own personal fitness levels and will then, with the aid of the instructor, design a total fitness program. Students will have the opportunity to develop an appropriate fitness program that enables them to improve the desired health related fitness components.


Elective Physical Education: Lifeguard Training (L)

DOE: 3560

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Physical Education I and II completed

Course Fee: $50.00

This class can only be taken after the required physical education classes are successfully completed. The purpose of this course is to teach students the skills and knowledge needed to be a professional lifeguard. The course content and activities prepare the students to recognize emergencies, respond quickly and effectively to emergencies, and how to prevent drowning and other accidents. The course also trains students in first aid and professional rescuer CPR.


Health and Wellness Education

DOE: 3506

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Health and Wellness Education is a course in health and safety and is required of every student. This course will be centered on the problems of adult living which students will face such as personal adjustment, emotional well-being, family living, good decision making and consumerism, utilization of professional services, and safety and first aid.


Advanced Health Education

DOE: 3500

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Health Education

This course is designed to concentrate more deeply on various subject matter offered during required Health Education. The units will pertain to in-depth subject areas including first aid and emergency care, health careers, diseases, physical fitness, and nutrition. The students will be required to fulfill written assignments as well as practical applications in each unit. Each student passing the advanced health course will be certified in CPR, familiar with various diseases, and go through a practical application of physical fitness and Nutrition.


Mathematics

Algebra I Lab

DOE: 2516

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Must be taken while also enrolled in Algebra I

This course is a mathematics support course for Algebra I, providing additional time to build the foundations necessary for high school math courses, while concurrently having access to rigorous, grade-level appropriate courses. The five critical areas of Algebra Enrichment align with the critical areas of Algebra I: Relationships between Quantities and Reasoning with Equations; Linear and Exponential Relationships; Descriptive Statistics; Expressions and Equations; and Quadratic Functions and Modeling. However, whereas Algebra I contains exclusively grade-level content, Algebra Enrichment combines standards from high school courses with foundational standards from the middle grades. *This course counts as a Mathematics course for the General Diploma only, or as an Elective for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas


Algebra I

DOE: 2520

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: None

This course is a systematic study of the structure, properties, and operations of number systems. Algebra is the foundation for all higher mathematics courses and is required of students who plan to attend college or certain technical schools.


Algebra II

DOE: 2522

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Algebra I

This course is strongly recommended for college preparatory students who have shown proficiency in Algebra I. After a brief review of beginning algebra, fundamental concepts are further developed and advanced topics studied.


Algebra II- Academic

DOE: 2522

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Algebra I and Academic Geometry

This course is strongly recommended for college preparatory students who have shown proficiency in Algebra I and Academic Geometry. After a brief review of beginning algebra, fundamental concepts of functions are further developed. Advanced topics are studied including Conics.


Algebra II- Honors

DOE: 2522

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Honors Geometry and selection by ID committee

This course will cover all topics normally covered in Academic Algebra II plus additional topics including matrices and trigonometry.. Most topics will be covered with more theory and in depth than Academic Algebra II. Students with a semester grade lower than 75% will be dropped from Honors Algebra II and moved to a corresponding Academic Algebra II.


Geometry

DOE: 2532

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Algebra I

Geometry is the systematic study of geometric elements and their relationships. Deductive reasoning is emphasized. Some space geometry and coordinate geometry are included. Geometry is usually required for admission to most colleges and may be helpful for technical

Schools.


Geometry- Academic

DOE: 2532

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Algebra I

This course begins by considering the basic but foundational truths of the systematic approach to geometry using ironclad reasoning. The course will evolve into proofs of fundamental angle pairs, triangle congruence, quadrilateral relationships, and basic trigonometry. Also, the course will tie in algebraic concepts experienced through geometric relativity.


Geometry- Honors

DOE: 2532

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Algebra I and successful selection by ID committee

This course will include all topics normally covered in Geometry, but with more theory and detail than in the regular course.


Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry

DOE: 2564

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Algebra II-Academic

Pre-Calculus is a study of trigonometry, analytical geometry, advanced algebra, and other topics that are prerequisite to a study of calculus.


Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry Honors

DOE: 2564

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Algebra II and selection by ID committee

Pre-Calculus is a study of trigonometry, analytical geometry, advanced algebra, and other topics that are prerequisite to a study of calculus. This course will move at a faster rate than Pre-Calculus and additional topics will be covered.


Trigonometry

HHS Only

DOE: 2566

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Algebra II

Trigonometry provides students with the skills and understandings that are necessary for advanced manipulation of angles and measurement. Trigonometry provides the foundation for common periodic functions that are encountered many disciplines, including music, engineering, medicine, and finance (and nearly all other STEM disciplines). Trigonometry consists of seven strands: Conics, Unit Circle, Geometry, Periodic Functions, Identities, Polar Coordinates, and Vectors. Students will also advance their understanding of imaginary numbers through an investigation of complex numbers and polar coordinates. A strong understanding of complex and imaginary numbers is a necessity for fields such as engineering and computer programming. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.


AP Calculus

DOE: 2562 (AB Calculus A/P) & DOE: 2572 (BC Calculus A/P)

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus

The subject of calculus concerns the study of tangents or rates of change and the study of area. It also includes many of the consequences and applications of these topics. At the end of the second semester, students will take the AP Calculus exam.


AP Statistics

DOE: 2570

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Algebra I , Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board.

The purpose of the AP course in statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Topics include: (1) exploring data: describing patterns and departures from patterns (2) sampling and experimentation: planning and conducting a study, (3) anticipating patterns: exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation, and (4) statistical inference: estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses. The use of graphing calculators and computer software is required.


Probability and Statistics

DOE: 2546

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Algebra II

Statistics is the study of how to collect, organize, analyze, and interpret data. The goal of probability is to numerically measure how likely a statement is to be true, how likely an event is to occur, or what we should expect the outcome of a process to be.


Finite Mathematics

DOE: 2530

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Algebra 2 (2 semesters; may take at the same time as semester 2 of Algebra II with instructor permission).

This course covers many topics not necessarily covered in the Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus, Calculus sequence of courses. The purpose of this course is to give a survey of mathematical analysis techniques use in the working world. It teaches analytical thinking and gives valuable experience at organizing information and then examining it. Suggested course for a student considering a major in business, accounting, or computers.


Multivariate Calculus

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: A/P Calculus, Level BC (MA 153/154), or with department head consent

This course covers topics in the fields of differential and integral calculus of several variables; lines; planes and curves in space; and an introduction to vector calculus.


Linear Algebra

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Open to any TSC student having taken Advanced Placement Calculus, Level BC (MA 153/154), or with the consent of the department head

This course is an introduction to linear algebra. Covering systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, vector spaces, determinants, eigenvalues, diagonalization of matrices, and some applications of these topics.


Quantitative Reasoning

MHS Only

DOE: 2550

Credit/s: 1 or 2

Semester/s: 1 or 2 (Each Semester is independent)

Prerequisite/s: Completion of Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II

This course is the study of numeracy, ratio and proportional reasoning, modeling, probabilistic reasoning to assess risk, and statistics. Students build knowledge of and confidence with basic mathematical/analytical concepts and operations required for problem solving, decision making, and economic productivity in real world applications and prepare for an increasingly information-based society in which the ability to use and critically evaluate information, especially numerical information, is essential.


Mathematics Lab

DOE: 2560

Credit/s: 1-8

Semester/s: 1-8

Mathematics Lab provides students with individual instruction designed to support success in completing mathematics coursework aligned with Indiana's Academic Standards for Mathematics. This course does not meet mathematics credit requirements for graduation. This course may be offered for one to eight elective mathematics credits.


Algebra II Lab

DOE: 2560

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Algebra II Lab provides students with a more individualized instructional approach designed to support success in completing Algebra II coursework aligned with Indiana’s Academic Standards. This course shall also provide additional instruction helping students achieve standards set forth in Indiana’s Standardized Testing Program. Algebra II Lab is to be taken in conjunction with Algebra II, and the content of Lab should be tightly aligned with the content of its corresponding course.


Math 10

DOE: 2531

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Algebra I and currently enrolled in Geometry

Math 10 is a two-semester course designed to reinforce and elevate the Algebra I and 7th and 8th grade geometry knowledge and skills necessary for students to successfully complete high school mathematics courses beyond Algebra I and essentials for passing the state’s graduation qualifying exam in mathematics. Enrollment will be contingent upon the recommendation of the Algebra I teacher based on diagnostic results of performance in Algebra I and/or mathematics competency assessments like NWEA. The standards for this course are aligned to the state standards that students need to master for success in the state’s graduation qualifying exam in mathematics and the next level math courses. Emphasis is on a variety of instructional methods designed to meet each student’s needs and delivered through competency-based units with frequent pre and post assessment data analyzed to drive instructional design and delivery.


CCR Bridge: Math Ready

HHS ONLY

DOE: 2514

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: In grade 11, students who have not passed the Grade 10 Math ISTEP+ (or old Algebra ECA) and have scored below a 45 on the PSAT test OR students who score below proficient on a diagnostic test should be placed in the Math Ready course. Recommended Grade Level: 12

This course will include and reinforce the Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II and Statistics skills necessary to be ready for an entry-level college math course. This course emphasizes understanding of math concepts rather than just memorizing procedures. Math Ready students learn the context behind the procedure: why to use a certain formula or method to solve a problem. This equips them with higher-order thinking skills in order to apply math skills, functions and concepts in different situations. The course is intended for students who currently have achieved the minimum math requirements for college entry. The content of this course is designed to enhance students’ math skills so that they are ready for college-level math assignments. It is not designed to prepare students for college-level math in STEM majors, Mathematics Course for all diplomas.


Advanced Math

HHS ONLY

DOE: 2544

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry

This course will be used to register students for dual credit with Ivy Tech for course number Math 212 Calculus II.


Multi-Disciplined Courses

Cadet Teaching Experience

DOE: 0502

Credit/s: 1 or 4

Semester/s:1or2 Combined

Prerequisite/s: Senior only; 2.5 GPA; No major disciplinary offenses

This opportunity is provided to seniors who plan to pursue a professional career in teaching. Students must apply for a cadet teaching assignment. Approval of cadet teaching will be based upon 2.5 GPA, good attendance, good discipline record, and completed Cadet Teaching application/process. Students in this program will perform a variety of classroom experiences at Burnett Creek, Mayflower Mill and Wea Ridge Elementary schools in addition to related classroom instruction at the high school. Experiences will include lesson plan preparation and execution, development of learning tools, related mini-assignments, discussion of student assessment and discipline techniques, etc. Assessment will include related classroom assignments, classroom observations/experiences, and a portfolio of students' work submitted at the conclusion of the semester. Students are responsible for providing their own transportation.


Career Information and Exploration

DOE: 0522

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: None

Grade Levels: Grade 11/12

This course provides students with opportunities to learn about themselves and about various traditional and nontraditional occupations and careers. Students also gain an awareness of the type of occupational preparation or training needed for various occupations and careers. Students develop skills in: (1) employability, (2) understanding the economic process, and (3) career decision making and planning. Opportunities are provided for students to observe and participate in various job situations through field trips, internships, mock interviews, and guest speakers. Resume development experience and career-related testing are also provided to students.


Career Exploration Internship

DOE: 0530

Credit/s: 4

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: None

Grade Levels: Grade 11/12

This course is a paid or unpaid work experience in the public or private sector that provides for workplace learning in an area of student career interest. Unlike a cooperative education program in which students gain expertise in a specific occupation, the career exploration internship is intended to expose students to broad aspects of a particular industry or career cluster area by rotating through a variety of work sites or departments. In addition to their workplace learning activities, students participate in 1) regularly scheduled meetings with their classroom teacher, or 2) a regularly scheduled seminar with the teacher for the purpose of helping the student make the connection between academic learning and their work-related experiences. Specific instructional objectives for the internship must be written to clarify the expectations of all parties-the student, parent, employer, and instructor.

· A 2-credit course over 1 semester

· This course may be taken for an additional semester to allow students to explore a second career area.

· 150 hours of workplace and classroom activities are required for the two credits. Of the 150 hours, 18 to 36 hours must be spent in related classroom instruction.


Basic Skills Development

DOE: 0500

Credit/s: 1/semester

Semester/s: 1-8

This course provides students with continuing opportunity to develop basic skills including: reading, writing, listening, speaking, mathematical computation, note taking, study and organizational skills, and problem-solving skills. Determination of the skills is based on Indiana standards, corporation curriculum plans, and student IEP’s. Skills selected will provide students with abilities to continue learning in a variety of life situations.


Science

Biology I (L)

DOE: 3024

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of previous science course

Biology I is a course based on the following core topics: cellular chemistry, structure and reproduction; matter cycles and energy transfer; interdependence of organisms; molecular basis of heredity; genetics and evolution. Instruction will focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.

· Recommender Grade Level: 9 or 10

· See Counselor for science course sequencing guide

· Fulfills the life science requirement for the General diploma, Fulfills Biology credit for Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas


Biology I, Honors (L)

DOE: 3024

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Student must apply as an eighth grader (recommendation by student or teacher) and have above average success in middle school science and math courses.

Honors Biology I:

Biology I is a course based on the following core topics: cellular chemistry, structure and reproduction; matter cycles and energy transfer; interdependence of organisms; molecular basis of heredity; genetics and evolution. Instruction will focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures. Biology I, Honors, is for the student interested in a career in science or a career in which a strong science background is required. The course content is similar to Biology I, except that material will be covered at an accelerated pace and in greater depth.

· Fulfills the life science requirement for the General diploma, Fulfills Biology credit for Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas


Biology II, AP (L)

DOE: 3020

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Biology I and either Chemistry I or Physics I

Biology II, Advanced Placement, is comparable to a college or university general biology course. The student will prepare for and take the Advanced Placement Biology Exam. Successful performance on this exam may earn college credit, depending on the policy of the college or university.


Advanced Science, Special Topics, Ecology (L)

DOE: 3092

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion or currently be enrolled in Chemistry I

Any student who is interested in entering a field of Biology or Agriculture upon graduation from high school would benefit from this course. The course will focus on the key concepts for understanding the varied ecological systems of our world, the interdependence of their component parts and, the economic, political, and social implications of ecological issues and concerns. This course will enhance scientific knowledge for those with an interest in pursuing occupations in environmental management for city, state or corporate waste treatment recycling, wildlife biology, Forestry, Landscape Architecture, Agriculture and all related fields necessary to manage the need for balancing urban sprawl, industrial expansion and agricultural issues for adequate food and clean water and air for current and future generations.


Advanced Science, Special Topics, Genetics (L)

DOE: 3092

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion or currently be enrolled in Chemistry I

Any students who are interested in entering the science field upon graduation from high school would benefit from this course. The course will focus on the causes, methods of diagnosis, treatments, and cures of genetic disorders; the social implications of biotechnology; and bioethical decision-making skills. This course will enhance scientific knowledge for those with an interest in pursuing medicine, nursing, veterinary medicine, dentistry, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and many other allied health professions.


Advanced Science, Special Topics, Body Systems/Health Science Career Topics

MHS ONLY

DOE: 3092

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Principles of Biomedical Sciences and Integrated Chemistry and Physics

An exploratory course in which students continue their investigation in aspects of the health science industry (carried on from PBS). There will be a focus on human body systems, medical terminology and health science careers. Students will observe the interactions between all body systems using appropriate software to monitor body functions. The content knowledge in body system functioning will be supplemented by basic medical terminology in order to identify areas of interest. There will be a large focus on career options within the health science field thus students will reflect on their own knowledge, skills and interests to begin narrowing their focus for post-secondary plans


Anatomy and Physiology

DOE: 5276

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Grade 11 or 12. Successful completion of Biology I (with a grade of A or B, or teacher’s consent), and completed either Chemistry I or Physics I

Anatomy and Physiology is a Biology II course for students thinking about potential careers in medicine, physical education, nutrition, pharmacy, physical therapy, veterinary medicine, nursing, and many other healthcare related professions. The structure and function of all tissue types and major organ systems such as skeletal, muscular, and nervous system will be emphasized. Classroom and laboratory exercises will be included.


Earth and Space Science I (L)

DOE: 3044

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: None

First Year Earth and Space Science provides opportunities to study concepts related to earth and space science through laboratory investigations and other activities.


Integrated Chemistry-Physics (ICP) (L)

DOE: 3108

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Algebra I (may be taken in concurrently with this course)

Integrated Chemistry-Physics (ICP) introduces the fundamental concepts of scientific inquiry, the structure of matter, chemical reactions, forces, motions, and the interactions between energy and matter. This course is a laboratory-based introduction into chemistry and physics. The course will enhance students' critical thinking and problem-solving abilities. Integrated Chemistry- Physics (ICP) is a Core 40 course with state standards.


Chemistry I (L)

DOE: 3064

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Biology I and Algebra I. (To take this class as a sophomore, it is recommended that the student has earned at least a C in both semesters of Algebra I)

Chemistry I is designed for the student who is preparing for college. The course provides an opportunity to study basic principles of modern chemistry, emphasis on laboratory techniques and investigations. The basic topics discussed in the course are: properties and states of matter, atomic structure, bonding, chemical reactions, solution chemistry, behavior of gases, and basic organic chemistry. Recommended Grade Level: 10-12


Chemistry I, Honors (L)

DOE: 3064

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Biology I, Algebra I, and selection through identification process.

Chemistry I, Honors is designed for the student who might be interested in pursuing a career in science or a career in which a strong science background is required. The course content is similar to Chemistry I except that the course material will be covered at an accelerated pace and in greater depth. A laboratory approach to problem solving will be introduced. The basic topics discussed in the course are: properties and states of matter, atomic structure, bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, behavior or gases, and basic organic chemistry. Recommended Grade Level: 10-12


Chemistry II, General (L)

DOE: 3066

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Chemistry I and Algebra II.

It is recommended that the student has earned at least a C in both semesters in Chemistry I. Chemistry II, General, is designed for the student who is preparing for college and needs additional background in chemistry. This course will review and further develop the principles of modern chemistry.


Chemistry II, A/P (L)

DOE: 3060

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Chemistry I and Algebra II. Also, successful completion or current enrollment in Pre-Calculus. It is recommended that the student has earned at least a C in both semesters in Chemistry I.

Chemistry II, Advanced Placement is designed for the student who is preparing for college and needs additional background in chemistry. This course is comparable to a college or university general chemistry course. The student will prepare for and take the Advanced Placement Chemistry Exam. Successful performance on this exam may earn college credit, depending on the policy of the college or university. Chemistry II, Advanced Placement, will meet for two periods in a block.


Physics I (L)

DOE: 3084

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Geometry and successful completion or current enrollment in Algebra II. Successful completion of Chemistry is strongly recommended.

Physics I is designed for the student who is preparing for college. The course provides the student the opportunity to study the basic physical laws emphasizing laboratory experience. The student will use computers for data acquisition and analysis.


Physics I: Algebra-Based, Advanced Placement (L)

DOE: 3080

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Algebra II and successful completion or current enrollment in Pre-Calculus.

Physics I: Algebra-Based, Advanced Placement, is designed for the student who is preparing for college seeking a future in math, science, or engineering, or liberal arts students of high academic ability. The course content is similar to Physics I; the material will be covered at an accelerated pace and in greater depth.. Students will be encouraged to prepare for the AP Physics exam(s).


Physics C, Mechanics A/P (L)

DOE: 3088

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Physics I (Physics I: Algebra-Based, Advanced Placement,recommended) and completion or current enrollment in Calculus.

Physics C, Advanced Placement is comparable to a college or university calculus-based mechanics physics course, providing instruction in each of the following six content areas: kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation. The course is designed for the student who is preparing for a science, mathematics, or engineering major in college. The student will prepare for and take the Advanced Placement Physics C (Mechanics) Exam. Successful performance on this exam may earn college credit, depending on the policy of the college or university where the student enrolls.


Physics C, Electricity and Magnetism, A/P (L)

DOE: 3088

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Physics I (Physics I: Algebra-Based, Advanced Placement, recommended) and completion or current enrollment in Calculus.

Physics C, Advanced Placement is comparable to a college or university calculus-based electricity and magnetism physics course, providing instruction in each of the following five content areas: electrostatics and conductors; capacitors and dielectrics; electric circuits; magnetic fields; and electromagnetism. The course is designed for the student who is preparing for a science, mathematics, or engineering major in college. The student will prepare for and take the Advanced Placement Physics C Exam (Electricity and Magnetism). Successful performance on this exam may earn college credit, depending on the policy of the college or university where the student enrolls.


Science Research, Independent Study (L)

DOE: 3008

Credit/s: 1-4

Semester/s: 1-4

Prerequisite/s: First year course of same discipline

Advanced Science, Independent Study is any science course which is standards-based and grounded in extended laboratory, field, and literature investigations into one or more specialized science disciplines, such as anatomy/physiology, astronomy, biochemistry, botany, ecology, electromagnetism, genetics, geology, nuclear physics, organic chemistry, etc. Students enrolled in this course engage in an in-depth study of the application of science concepts, principles, and unifying themes that are unique to that particular science discipline and that address specific technological, environmental or health-related issues. Under the direction of a science advisor, students enrolled in this course will complete an end-of-course project and presentation, such as a scientific research paper or science fair project, integrating knowledge, skills, and concepts from the student's course of study. Individual projects are preferred, but group projects may be appropriate if each student in the group has specific and unique responsibilities.


Advanced Science: Introduction to Forensics Science

DOE: 3092

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Biology I, Chemistry I, Algebra I, Geometry

This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to introduce the fundamental concepts of scientific inquiry, evidence collection, use of scientific instrumentation, analysis of evidence, and the evaluation of evidence. This course will be laboratory-based introduction to the forensics sciences, equivalent to Ivy Tech’s Introduction to Forensic Science (FORN 101).


PLTW: Principles of Biomedical Sciences

MHS Only

DOE: 5218

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Integrated Chemistry and Physics or Administration Approval

Course Fee: $25.00

This PLTW course offers students an array of advantages, from career readiness and hands-on experience to college preparatory classes, labs, and creative exercises. Students investigate the human body systems and various health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. Students determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person, and investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person's life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, medicine, research processes and bioinformatics. This course is designed to provide an overview of all the courses in the Biomedical Sciences program and lay the scientific foundation for subsequent courses.


Social Studies

Geography and History of the World

DOE: 1570

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: None

The Standards and Indicators developed for The Geography and History of the World, high school course, are designed to enable students to use the concepts and skills of Geography to deepen their understanding of history. The students will not only learn the important concepts of location, place-name identification, and physical phenomena, but also the deeper concepts of origin, diffusion, cultural landscape, national character, and spatial variation, interaction, organization, and distribution. The Geography and History of the World course will primarily focus on "recent" history, but in order to fully understand "recent" history, "ancient" history must also be discussed.

World History and Civilization

DOE: 1548

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: None

This is a year-long course that emphasizes events and developments in the past that greatly affected large numbers of people across broad areas and that significantly influenced peoples and places in subsequent eras. Key events related to people and places as well as transcultural interaction and exchanges are examined in this course. Students are expected to compare and contrast events and developments involving diverse peoples and civilizations in different regions of the world. They will examine examples of continuity and change, universality and particularity, and unity and diversity among various peoples and cultures from the past to the present. Students are also expected to practice skills and process of historical thinking and research and apply content knowledge to the practice of thinking and inquiry skills and processes.


World History, A/P

DOE: 1576

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Recommendation of previous Social Studies instructor

This is a year-long course designed to increase knowledge of global events, perspectives, and interactions from 8000 B.C. to the present. This course is equivalent to a full-year introductory college course. Students will study an engaging and rigorous curriculum that allows them to develop an understanding of selected themes in world history, make comparisons between various human societies, observe and discuss change and continuity of these societies over time, recognize and discuss different historical interpretations, critically analyze historical evidence, and express that understanding and analysis in writing. Students who take AP World History can seek college credit and/or advanced placement from institutions of higher learning.


United States History

DOE: 1542

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Grade 10

This course will emphasize primarily the 20th Century. The first two weeks of the fall semester will review English heritage, steps toward independence, development of the Constitution, U.S. Political development, and industrial growth. The second quarter will cover Chapter 14, the 2nd Industrial Revolution, life at the turn of the 20th century, the Progressives, the First World War, the Roaring 20's. The second semester will begin with the Great Depression. This semester will cover the U.S. role in WWII, The Cold War, the Great Society, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, political and social issues from 1968 – 21st Century, and issues in contemporary American Society.


United States History, A/P

DOE: 1562

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Grade 11 & Permission of Instructor

The Advanced Placement United States History course curriculum has been approved by the College Board and exceeds the current Indiana State Social Studies standards. In accordance with College Board Standards, this course will concentrate more on Early American History than required by the State of Indiana. This course will emphasize preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam through primary source analysis, critical reading, writing and speaking, debate, and simulation. Study during the fall semester begins with geography and pre-colonial history and ends with Westward expansion. The Gilded Age is the first topic of the second semester, which focuses on modern American history to the present day.


Topics in History: History of Wars

DOE: 1538

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grade 11- 12

This elective course will be a topical based course that rotates as instructor interest and building interest directs. Topics include: WWII, causes of WWII, the European Theater of Operations, the Pacific Theater of Operations, the “home front” during WWII, roles of women and minorities during WWII, results of WWII, the impact of WWII upon the US in foreign relations, the American Civil War, Civil War causes and nature, and the results of the American Civil War. Additional topics could include, but are not limited to the Vietnam War and modern American conflicts.


Topics in History: Modern U.S. History-Domestic

DOE: 1538

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grade 11

This course will provide students with a better understanding of the world that they inherit by examining U.S. domestic affairs including social, political, and economic history of the past 60 years. Students will examine cultural artifacts like music, art, and film interwoven with analysis of the trends in society, technology, politics, and globalization to build a complete picture of modern America. This class will use research, presentation, discussion and debate to learn the history of our culture and what makes us truly American.


Topics in History: Modern U.S. History-Foreign Policy

DOE: 1538

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grades 11-12

The purpose of this elective course is to study current world affairs and their impact upon the United States. In pursuit of this objective, research is required into where the problem areas of the world are and what factors make them problem areas. Through research, class discussion and simulations, efforts to alleviate the problems existing in these areas are analyzed and evaluated.


Topics in History: History of American Sports

DOE: 1538

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: United States History & World History

This course will examine the historical development of sports in the United States from a societal, cultural, racial, and economic viewpoint. The history of sports, particularly in the years after the Civil War, is a “mirror” in which many aspects of American social history are reflected. The course will provide the student the opportunity to examine the relationship between sports and nationalism, sports and politics, sports and the economy, sports and societal change, sports and gender, along with sports and American expansion.


Sociology

DOE: 1534

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grade 11-12

This elective course deals with attitudes, values, and norms as they relate to society. Deviation from these factors and how society deals with these deviations is also studied. Social groups and stratification are covered, as are minorities and how they fit into the social structure. Family and education are covered as they relate to social institutions. Various social problems are discussed such as equal rights, ecology, poverty, aging, and crime. Causes of criminal behavior, identifying criminals, the role of organized crime, statistical information, and the judicial and penal systems are also studied.


Psychology

DOE: 1532

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grade 11-12

The overall theme of this elective course is the understanding of human behavior as it relates to the individual. The following areas of psychology are studied in an effort to develop this understanding: personality; mental health and illness; social psychology; the family; learning and remembering; friendships; attitudes; parapsychology; hypnosis; emotional behavior; and motivation.


Economics

DOE: 1514

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grade 12

Primary attention is addressed to the free enterprise system, although philosophies of communism and socialism are studied and related to capitalism. Factors affecting the economy such as business organizations, labor organizations, collective bargaining, inflation, deflation, government regulation of business, advertising, credit buying, interest rates and balance of trade deficits are studies. Principles to aid the consumer in making wise choices in purchasing, savings, and investment are also emphasized.


A/P Economics

DOE: 1566 (Microeconomics) & DOE: 1564 (Macroeconomics)


Credit/s: 1-2 Semester/s: 1-2

Prerequisite/s: Grade 12

  • HHS: This two semester course provides preparation for 2 AP exams, one in microeconomics taught in semester 1, and one in macroeconomics taught in semester 2.
  • MHS: This course is offered by the semester, with students being able to choose to take one or both semesters in preparation of AP exams for the corresponding course.

Microeconomics, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. The course gives students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economics system. Topics include: basic economic concepts, the nature and functions of product markets, factor markets, and market failure and the role of government.

Macroeconomics, Advanced Placement is a course based on the content established by the College Board. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determinations, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. Topics include: Basic economic concepts, measurement of economic performance, national income and price determination, economic growth, and international finance, exchange rates, and balance of payments.


United States Government

DOE: 1540

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grade 12

This course described the three major branches of our national government, as they operate interdependently and as they impinge on local government units. We will concern ourselves with the constitutional basis of this system, the democratic processes by which it is controlled and operated, and the organization, powers, and functions of the national government. A careful study of the First Amendment, regarding individual rights as well as the various amendments dealing with due process of law are also included. Units on state and local governments, politics and voting will also be covered.


Government and Politics: United States, A/P

DOE: 1560

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grade 12

The AP course in United States Government and Politics will give an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. The students will become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes.

The main topics are: Constitutional Underpinnings of United States Government; Political Beliefs and Behaviors; Political Parties, Interest Groups, and Mass Media; Institutions of National Government; Public Policy; Civil Rights and Civil Liberties.


Anthropology

MHS Only

DOE: 1502

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

Prerequisite/s: Grade 11-12

This elective course studies aspects of human cultures, past and present, in the field of anthropology. From archaeological explorations of local Native American populations, to studies of human populations and their adaptations to increasing environmental pressures, anthropology has grown into a subject that appeals to many different students with varied interests. Anthropology would provide students with the opportunity to explore a broad range of topics with real-world connections, and to apply their own skills, knowledge, and curiosity to a subject, which is both dynamic and hands-on.


Ethnic Studies

DOE: 1516

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

This course provides opportunities to broaden student’s perspectives concerning lifestyles and cultural patterns of ethnic groups in the United States. This course will either focus on a particular ethnic group or groups, or use a comparative approach to the study of patterns of cultural development, immigration, and assimilation, as well as the contributions of specific ethnic or cultural groups. The course may also include analysis of the political impact of ethnic diversity in the United States.


Indiana Studies

DOE: 1518

Credit/s: 1

Semester/s: 1

This course is an integrated course that compares and contrasts state and national developments in the areas of politics, economics, history, and culture. The course uses Indiana history as a basis for understanding current policies, practices, and state legislative procedures. It also includes the study of state and national constitutions from a historical perspective and as a current foundation of government. Examination of individual leaders and their roles in a democratic society will be included and student will examine the participation of citizens in the political process. Selections from Indiana arts and literature may also be analyzed for insights into historical events and cultural expressions.


World Languages

Spanish I

DOE: 2120

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Students will learn pronunciation, accentuation, beginning conversation, and fundamental grammatical terminologies and structures, including present, preterit, and near future verb forms. On-going vocabulary-building and active participation in reading, writing, listening, and speaking are expected. Students will do skits, songs, and recitations. This course offers a beginning foundation for the Spanish II course. Cultural learning will include Mexico, Spain, Hispanics in America, as well as the locations and capitals of Spanish-speaking countries.


Spanish II

DOE: 2122

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Spanish I or permission of instructors

Spanish II will focus on grammar and intermediate conversation. This course continues the study of grammar structures and vocabulary. Reading and writing skills are emphasized. Students will do short writings and read short selections. Students will participate in brief conversations with a focus on answering guided questions in Spanish. Students will be engaged in Spanish and be expected to communicate using thematic grammar and vocabulary. Students will learn preterit, imperfect, and command structures. This course prepares students for Spanish III. Students can expect a fast-paced class that covers many grammar concepts, verb tenses, and vocabulary units. Students will also learn cultural, geographical, and historical information about Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Spain, and the Dominican Republic.


Spanish III

DOE: 2124

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Spanish II or permissions of instructors

This course advances the skills of listening comprehension, reading, speaking, and writing. This class is taught almost entirely in Spanish. Students are engaged in Spanish and are expected to respond in Spanish. Oral skills are the main focus in this class. Students will write and recite original speeches, create impromptu conversations, and engage in Spanish dialogue. Topics may include technology and communication, roles in society, community, culture and civilization.

This course is a dual credit course through Ivy Tech. Students will be given the option to earn college credit or not. College credit is contingent on test scores such as SAT, PSAT, or Accuplacer.


Spanish IV

DOE: 2126

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Spanish III or permission of instructors

This course is a comprehensive review of the previous three years. Topics may include the culture and history of both Spain and Hispanic countries. Spanish IV instructors conduct the entire class in Spanish. Communicating in Spanish at all times will allow students to polish their oral skills in preparation for college level courses. Students will focus on developing more advanced writing and listening skills similar to those in college Spanish courses. Students will also read authentic materials including short stories, poems, and magazine articles. Students may take field trips to Hispanic markets where they can communicate in Spanish. Students can expect larger projects that include grammar and vocabulary from a unit with both written and oral components.

This course is a dual credit course through Ivy Tech. Students will be given the option to earn college credit or not. College credit is contingent on test scores such as SAT, PSAT, or Accuplacer.


Spanish for Heritage Speakers I:

MHS Only

DOE: 2190

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: None, or placement as determined at local level

Spanish for Heritage Speakers I is a course designed for heritage speakers of Spanish who have demonstrated some degree of oral proficiency in Spanish. The purpose of this course is to enable heritage Spanish speakers to increase proficiency and biliteracy in Spanish by providing opportunities to improve reading and listening comprehension, as well as writing and grammar skills in Spanish. Special attention will be given to spelling, accents, grammar and vocabulary of standard Spanish, as well as to the importance of biculturalism and bilingualism in the United States today. Placement of students and development of the course curriculum is dependent upon the population of students enrolled in this course. Spanish for Heritage Speakers I fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma. It also fulfills a Career Academic Sequence or Flex Credit course.


Spanish for Heritage Speakers II:

MHS Only

DOE: 2192

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: Successful completion of Spanish for Heritage Speakers I

This course is designed for heritage speakers of Spanish to continue to increase proficiency and biliteracy in Spanish by providing opportunities to improve reading and listening comprehension, as well as writing and grammar skills in Spanish. Special attention will be given to spelling, accents, grammar and vocabulary of standard Spanish, as well as to the importance of biculturalism and bilingualism in the United States today. Placement of students and development of the course curriculum is dependent upon the population of students enrolled in the course. Spanish for Heritage Speakers II fulfills a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma. It also fulfills a Career Academic Sequence or Flex Credit.


French I

DOE: 2020

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: None

French I is an introduction and beginning conversation course. In this initial year, the student learns the basis of communication skills in the French language. Grammar is taught with emphasis on communicating with people in real situations. The student is also introduced to the culture and people of French-speaking lands and to the ways in which they differ from us.


French II

DOE: 2022

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: French I or permission of instructor

French II will focus on grammar and intermediate conversation. Students learn to express themselves more clearly on a variety of topics, both in the present and past, as well as regarding future plans. Cultural relationships within the French-speaking world are also emphasized.


French III

DOE: 2024

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: French II or permission of instructor

This course emphasizes advanced listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Various tenses and verbs including the future and conditional tense are studied. This course is a dual credit course through Ivy Tech. Students will be given the option to earn college credit or not. College credit is contingent on test scores such as SAT, PSAT, or Accuplacer.


French IV

DOE: 2026

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: French III or permission of instructor

This course is a comprehensive review of the previous three years. Topics will include verb usage and advanced vocabulary. Communication in French is emphasized. This course is a dual credit course through Ivy Tech. Students will be given the option to earn college credit or not. College credit is contingent on test scores such as SAT, PSAT, or Accuplacer.


German I

HHS Only

DOE: 2040

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Students will learn German pronunciation, beginning conversation, basic vocabulary, and fundamental grammatical terminologies and structures, including present tense forms of regular, irregular and modal verbs and nominative, accusative and dative case articles, pronouns and prepositions. On-going vocabulary-building and active participation in reading, writing, listening, and speaking are expected. Various cultural topics will be presented.


German II

HHS Only

DOE: 2042

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: German I or permission of instructor

German II will continue topics of the first-year course. The course will focus on various vocabulary themes and on future and present tenses, articles, adjective endings, and pronouns as well as other grammar points. This course continues the study of structure and vocabulary. Reading, writing, and speaking skills are emphasized. Students will do short writings and read short selections. A variety of cultural topics will be presented.


German III

HHS Only

DOE: 2044

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: German II or instructor recommendation

This course advances the skills of listening comprehension, reading, speaking, and writing. Vocabulary topics may include technology and communication, roles in society, community, culture, and civilization and grammar topics will present proper usage of conjunctions, subjunctive, imperfect tense, and passive voice as well as other grammar points. New cultural topics will be addressed.


German IV

HHS Only

DOE: 2046

Credit/s: 2

Semester/s: 2

Prerequisite/s: German III or instructor recommendation

This course is comprehensive in grammar and vocabulary review of German I-IV. New grammar and vocabulary points presented are in upper-level topics. German culture and history will be discussed. Communication and instruction solely in German is emphasized. Student focus is on developing advanced reading, writing, and listening skills for preparation in German college coursework. Students will read authentic, culturally relevant materials available to native speakers.

This course is a dual credit course through Indiana University Kokomo.


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